Preprofessional Advisement Information

Pre-Medical Advisement Information

Pre-Medical Advisement Information
Physicians often work closely with other healthcare staff including physician assistants, registered nurses, and medical records and health information technicians.

Physicians and surgeons diagnose and treat injuries or illnesses. Physicians examine patients; take medical histories; prescribe medications; and order, perform, and interpret diagnostic tests. They often counsel patients on diet, hygiene, and preventive healthcare. Surgeons operate on patients to treat injuries, such as broken bones; diseases, such as cancerous tumors; and deformities, such as cleft palates.

 

There are two types of physicians, with corresponding degrees: M.D. (Medical Doctor) and D.O. (Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine). Both use the same methods of treatment, including drugs and surgery, but D.O.s place additional emphasis on the body’s musculoskeletal system, preventive medicine, and holistic (whole-person) patient care. D.O.s are most likely to be primary care physicians, although they can be found in all specialties.

Physicians and surgeons typically do the following:

Take a patient’s medical history
Update charts and patient information to show current findings and treatments
Order tests for nurses or other healthcare staff to perform
Review test results to identify any abnormal findings
Recommend and design a plan of treatment
Address concerns or answer questions that patients have about their health and well-being
Help patients take care of their health by discussing topics such as proper nutrition and hygiene
In addition, surgeons operate on patients to treat injuries, diseases, or deformities.

Physicians and surgeons work in one or more of several specialties. The following are examples of types of physicians and surgeons:

Anesthesiologists, Family and general physicians, General internists, General pediatricians, Obstetricians and gynecologists (OB/GYNs), Psychiatrists, Surgeons, Allergists (specialists in diagnosing and treating hay fever and other allergies), Cardiologists (heart specialists), Dermatologists (skin specialists), Gastroenterologists (digestive system specialists), Ophthalmologists (eye specialists), Pathologists (specialists who study body tissue to see if it is normal or abnormal), and Radiologists (specialists who review and interpret x-ray pictures and deliver radiation treatments for cancer and other illnesses)

Physicians work daily with other healthcare staff, such as registered nurses, other physicians, medical assistants, and medical records and health information technicians.

(Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014. Retrieved from www.bls.gov)

 

Students typically attend medical school after completing a baccalaureate degree.  Most medical schools require a baccalaureate degree as part of the admissions requirements. Medical programs are typically four years, and students follow medical school with three or more years in residency (specialized clinical training).

Sample Pre-Medicine Four-Year Academic Plans
Plan A:  Starting with General Biology and College Algebra

FALL                                                                       SPRING                                                                SUMMER

Year 1:

Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1610)             Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)           CHEM 1220 &  Lab

College Algebra (MATH 1050)                     Trigonometry* (MATH 1060)

Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)

Year 2:

Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 2310)              Organic Chem. II (CHEM 2320)

Elementary Psychology** (PSY 1010)       Vertebrate Physiology (BIOL 4500)

 

Year 3:

College Physics I (PHYS 2010)                       College Physics II (PHYS 2020)

Biochemistry*** (CHEM 3510)                   Advanced biology course***                     Apply to medical school June 1st

Intro to Sociology (SOC 1010)                      Take MCAT in spring or summer

 

Year 4:

Courses to complete major                          Courses to complete major

 

Plan B:  Starting with Principles of Chemistry and Trigonometry

FALL                                                                       SPRING                                                                SUMMER

Year 1:

Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)     Principles of Chemistry II (CHEM 1220)

Trigonometry (MATH 1060)*                       Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1610)

Elementary Psychology** (PSY 1010)

 

Year 2:

Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)            Organic Chemistry II        (CHEM 2320)

Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 2310)              Organic Chemistry Labs (CHEM 2315 & 2325)

 

Year 3:

College Physics I (PHYS 2010)                       College Physics II (PHYS 2020)

Biochemistry*** (CHEM 3510)                   Advanced biology course***                      Apply to medical school June 1st

Intro to Sociology (SOC 1010)                      Take MCAT in spring or summer

 

Year 4:

Courses to complete major                          Courses to complete major

* Calculus is not required for most medical schools, but is required for some science majors.  The major will determine which math class is taken.

** While psychology is not a prerequisite for most medical schools, topics from psychology will form 60% of the content of one exam of MCAT-2015, and topics from sociology will form 30%. To be well-prepared, students may wish to complete an introductory course in psychology (Elementary Psychology PSY 1010) and, possibly, sociology (Sociology SOC 1010).   Consult with your pre-medical advisor for more information.

***One advanced biology course is a required prerequisite for some medical schools; additional advanced biology courses are recommended.  Biochemistry (CHEM 4110) can be used to satisfy this requirement.  It will also be important for students to know biochemistry since topics from biochemistry will be tested on MCAT-2015.

Note:  Most medical schools require two courses in English and four courses in social and behavioral sciences/humanities.   These may be satisfied by the courses a student selects for the General Education Requirements.  Check websites for the individual medical schools requirements or see your pre-medical advisor for more information.

Academic Guidelines
Competition for places in medical school is keen and admissions committees are able to choose from among many talented students.  The mean cumulative GPA for the entering 2015 class at the University of Utah College of Medicine was 3.66.   For the 2015 academic cycle, the University of Utah’s College of Medicine received over 5,000 applications for 122 positions.  Students whose academic records fall well below the averages are unlikely to be accepted to medical school.

Non-Academic Guidelines
Important non-academic factors include good moral character, excellent interpersonal skills, a deep commitment to health care, evidence of leadership potential, and service to others.  Successful applicants will likely have volunteered or worked in a health care setting with patient contact, job shadowed a physician, participated in organizations that serve others, taken advantage of leadership opportunities, and learned how to conduct research and work independently.

University of Utah College of Medicine Admissions Profile 2015:

(122 students admitted)*

Mean cumulative GPA:                  3.66                        Mean MCAT:  30.1

 

*The University of Utah School of Medicine is a state-assisted institution. A minimum of 82% of the available positions are offered to Utah residents and/or non-residents who graduated from a Utah high school, college or university. Eight positions are reserved for Idaho residents. The remaining spots are open to out of state residents who obtained their bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university in the United States or Canada.

 

The Application Process
Applications for allopathic medical schools are initiated through the centralized, online American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS) (www.aamc.org/students/). Applications for osteopathic medical schools originate through the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service (AACOMAS) (www.aacom.org).  Applications should be submitted in the year proceeding the year for which a student is seeking admission.  Since many medical schools have rolling admissions, it is in a student’s best interest to apply early (after June 1st).   Students applying to allopathic medical schools should consult the Medical School Admissions Requirements (MSAR), available for purchase online through the AAMC.

Diversity in Medicine
Many medical schools seek to recruit a diverse class of students, including students from groups underrepresented in medicine.  The AAMC is particularly encouraging African-American, Latino/a, and Native American students, as these populations make up 25 percent of the United States population, but only 12 percent of medical school graduates.   Students may find information and support at www.aspiringdocs.org.  Students may also contact their pre-medical advisors, and individual medical schools, for more information.

Entrance Examination Requirement (MCAT)
The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) is a standardized, computer-based exam and is required for admission to both allopathic (M.D.) and osteopathic (D.O.) programs.  A new version of the MCAT, beginning in January 2015, will differ from the current exam in several ways.  Students entering college in August 2014 and beyond will be taking this new exam.  Preparation consists of completing the applicable pre-medical courses, self-study and taking MCAT practice tests, or participating in a formal MCAT test preparation course.

Letters of Evaluation/Recommendation
Applicants typically obtain letters from science faculty members, faculty members from the applicant’s major department, pre-medical advisors, research supervisors, volunteer coordinators, etc.   Most medical schools require three letters:  two academic and one of the student’s choice.  At least one of the academic letters should be from a science faculty member, and one should be from the student’s major department (this could be the same letter if the student is a science major).  Some medical schools require two letters from science faculty.  Students applying to osteopathic medical schools should plan to have one letter from a D.O.  Current information about the process is provided annually at the RHS “Applier’s Meeting” arranged during spring semester.

Interviews
Medical schools usually require personal, on-campus interviews.  Selected candidates will be contacted to arrange an interview.  Interviews vary by school; applicants should check with the schools to which they have applied for the interview timeline.   The interview is an important part of the selection process, and candidates should prepare well for the interview.   Practice interviews are available through the Rural Health Scholars program.  Contact an advisor to set up a mock interview.

Criminal Background Checks
The AMCAS & ACOMAS applications ask applicants whether they have a record of felonies or misdemeanors, and this information is then communicated to the medical schools.  Students should make careful decisions throughout their undergraduate years, since charges for drug and/or alcohol use or possession, as well as other charges, can have negative consequences for admission. Most medical schools conduct a Criminal Background Check on all admitted students.   Students found to have been dishonest on their applications are not admitted.

Citizenship/International Students
Only citizens or permanent residents of the United States are eligible for admission to most US medical schools, with the exception of candidates with asylum status.  Very few U.S. medical schools admit non-citizens.   Since the odds can be challenging, non-citizen students should thoroughly research and carefully consider such a decision and discuss it with their pre-medical advisors early in their undergraduate years.

Websites
Allopathic Medicine: www.aamc.org

Osteopathic Medicine:  www.aacom.org

U of U College of Medicine:  www.medicine.utah.edu

 

 

Pre-Medical Coursework Checklist
____Trigonometry (MATH 1060) or higher
____Prin. of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)
____ Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1610)
____Prin. of Chemistry II (CHEM 1220)
____ Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)
____Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 2310)
____ Principles of Biology Labs
____Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 2320)
____ Cell/Molecular Biology +Lab*  (BIOL 3550)
____Organic Chemistry Labs
____ General Psychology (PSY 1010)
____Biochemistry I (CHEM 3510)
____ Introduction to Sociology (SOC 1010)
____Biochemistry II (CHEM 3520)

Two semesters of physics—choose one sequence**:

____College Physics I (PHYS 2010) and College Physics II (PHYS 2020) or

____Physics for Scientists and Engineers (PHYS 2210 & 2220) – required for some science majors

____English (Composition/Literature)
____English (Composition/Literature) (two courses)

Social and Behavioral Science/Humanities (two courses)

1.  __________________________                         3. _______________________________
* Additional advanced biology courses are desirable.

**Most students enroll in the College Physics sequence.   The calculus-based sequences are possible but typically only for those pursing majors which require Calculus based physics.  See your advisor for help in choosing the appropriate sequence for your major.

Note:   The above are general prerequisites.  Some M.D. and D.O. Programs may have different requirements.  Check the websites for individual schools or contact your pre-medical advisor for more information.

Rocky Vista University College of Osteopathic Medicine (RVUCOM) Early Acceptance Program (EAP)

 

Rocky Vista University College of Osteopathic Medicine (RVUCOM)

RVUCOM’s Early Acceptance Program (EAP) will grant a provisional acceptance to highly motivated students at Southern Utah University and Dixie State University enrolled in The Rural Health Scholars Program. Up to fifteen seats will be reserved per year for these students. (2+ years leadership in RHS preferred).

RVUCOM representatives will meet with interested premed students to increase awareness of osteopathic medicine, RVUCOM and the EAP. RVUCOM representatives will include a minimum of two faculty members (Ph.D. and clinician) and an admissions representative. RVUCOM will promote the program via their web site and catalog/student handbook.

Students in the EAP program will not be required to take the MCAT (as long as they continue to meet program requirements). Students will gain early exposure to and support from RVUCOM.

If you are interested, watch for more details and meetings throughout the semester. Contact your advisor for more information or to apply.

(RVUCOM)

Pre-Dental Advisement Information

Dentists diagnose and treat problems with a patient’s teeth, gums, and related parts of the mouth. They provide advice and instruction on taking care of teeth and gums and on diet choices that affect oral health.

Dentists typically do the following:

·   Remove decay from teeth and fill cavities

·   Repair cracked or fractured teeth and remove teeth

·   Straighten teeth to correct bite issues

·   Place sealants or whitening agents on teeth

·   Administer anesthetics to keep patients from feeling pain during procedures

·   Write prescriptions for antibiotics or other medications

·   Examine x rays of teeth, gums, the jaw, and nearby areas for problems

·   Make models and measurements for dental appliances, such as dentures, to fit patients

·   Teach patients about diet, flossing, use of fluoride, and other aspects of dental care

 

Dentists use a variety of equipment, including x-ray machines, drills, mouth mirrors, probes, forceps, brushes, and scalpels. They also use lasers, digital scanners, and other computer technologies.

Dentists in private practice also oversee a variety of administrative tasks, including bookkeeping and buying equipment and supplies. They employ and supervise dental hygienists, dental assistants, dental laboratory technicians, and receptionists.

Most dentists are general practitioners and handle a variety of dental needs. Other dentists practice in one of nine specialty areas:

Dental public health specialists promote good dental health and the prevention of dental diseases in specific communities.

Endodontists perform root-canal therapy, by which they remove the nerves and blood supply from injured or infected teeth.

Oral and maxillofacial radiologists diagnose diseases in the head and neck through the use of imaging technologies.

Oral and maxillofacial surgeons operate on the mouth, jaws, teeth, gums, neck, and head, including procedures such as surgically repairing a cleft lip and palate or removing impacted teeth.

Oral pathologists diagnose conditions in the mouth, such as bumps or ulcers, and oral diseases, such as cancer.

Orthodontists straighten teeth by applying pressure to the teeth with braces or other appliances.

Pediatric dentists focus on dentistry for children and special-needs patients.

Periodontists treat the gums and bone supporting the teeth.

Prosthodontists replace missing teeth with permanent fixtures, such as crowns and bridges, or with removable fixtures such as dentures.

(Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014. Retrieved from www.bls.gov)

 

A degree in Dentistry is a four-year professional degree.  Students attend dental school after they have completed an undergraduate degree or a minimum of 90 semester hours toward a degree.  In the past it was true that students were often able to enter dental school without a bachelor’s degree, and is still true in some cases today, but due to the highly competitive nature of admissions acceptance of a non-baccalaureate student is very rare.

Sample Pre-Dentistry Four-Year Academic Plans
Plan A:  Starting with General Chemistry and Trigonometry or College Algebra

FALL                                                                       SPRING                                                                SUMMER

Year 1:

Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1610)              Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)     CHEM 1220

College Algebra (MATH 1050)                     Trigonometry* (MATH 1060)                       & Lab

Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)

 

Year 2:

Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 2310)              Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 2320)

Advanced Biology Course                             Vertebrate Physiology (BIOL 4500)

 

Year 3:

Courses to complete major                          Courses to complete major                          Apply to

Biochemistry (CHEM 3510)                           Advanced biology course                             dental school

Take DAT in spring or summer                   in June

 

Year 4:

College Physics I (PHYS 2010)                       College Physics II (PHYS 2020)

Courses to complete major                          Courses to complete major

 

Plan B:  Starting with Principles of Chemistry

FALL                                                                       SPRING                                                                SUMMER

Year 1:

Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)     Principles of Chemistry II (CHEM 1220)

Calculus (MATH 1210)                                     Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1610)

Elementary Psychology (PSY 1010)

 

Year 2:

Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)            Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 2320)

Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 2310)

 

Year 3:

College Physics I (PHYS 2010)                       College Physics II (PHYS 2020)                     Apply to

Biochemistry*** (BIOL 3510)                      Advanced biology course                              dental school

Take DAT in spring or summer                   in June

Year 4:

Courses to complete major                          Courses to complete major

*While most dental schools have no formal math requirement, many strongly recommend a semester of calculus.  Minimally, math through trigonometry is needed for College Physics I-II.

***The DAT may be taken as early as after the completion of two to three weeks of Organic Chemistry II.  Physics is not included in the DAT.

NOTE: Please always consult the DSU Catalog for updated course information (http://catalog.dixie.edu/courses/)

Academic Guidelines
An overall GPA of 3.5 or above (on a 4.0 scale) is the preferred GPA for consideration for admission.  Students with average GPA above a cumulative 3.5 are most successful.  Additionally, a science GPA average of 3.5 is highly desirable; this GPA includes grades in biology, chemistry, physics, math, statistics and computer science courses.

Non-Academic Guidelines
Visit the dental schools:  Any student who wants to assess dentistry as a potential career is encouraged to visit schools and participate in events such as simulation courses offered at various schools; go dressed professionally.

Undergraduate Research:  Students should do all possible to obtain research experience as an undergraduate.

Shadowing:  While there is no formula for hours spent volunteering, working, or shadowing in a dentistry clinic, any exploration of the field helps students make more informed decisions regarding their suitability for a career in dentistry. Many schools are now asking for 50 or more hours.

The Application Process
All U.S. dental schools require applicants to take the Dental Admissions Test (DAT).  Most schools use the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) for initiating an application.  ADEA sponsors the online Associated American Dental Schools Application Service (AADSAS):  www.adea.org. Students should apply as early as possible! Students should check the ADEA Official Guide to Dental Schools for deadlines at other schools and should apply well before listed deadlines.

Diversity in Dentistry
ADEA has stated that the number of graduates of dental and allied dental programs should reflect their representation in the population and the communities in which they will serve, and that recruitment, retention and graduation of practitioners from disadvantaged groups are goals that are important for the public’s health (from the ADEA website).

Students are encouraged to contact their pre-dentistry advisors, and the individual dental schools, for more information.

Entrance Examination Requirement (DAT)
It is preferred that the DAT is taken no later than August of the calendar year preceding the year in which the applicant wishes to enroll in the Dental College.  Students register online at www.ada.org.  The test consists of four sections:  a Survey of Natural Sciences (biology, general chemistry, and organic chemistry), Reading Comprehension, Quantitative Reasoning, and Perceptual Ability.  Two summary scores are reported, one on academic subjects and one for perceptual ability, as well as scores on individual sections.  The scoring range is from 1 to 30. The average score for students accepted is 19 for each subtest.  The current national average is between 17 and 18.

Letters of Evaluation/Recommendation
Letters of evaluation will be required of applicants.  Letters from a faculty member, dentist, academic advisor, or employer would be appropriate.  Information about the non-academic character of a student would be most useful as academic information is already in the application.  Students should have their evaluation letters submitted directly through AADSAS. Current information about the process is provided at the RHS “Applier’s Meeting” held during spring semester.

Interviews
Most schools screen applicants with some form of personal interview.  Most schools use the traditional one-on-one interview but some are now using multiple mini interviews (MMI). Admission is based on GPA, DAT scores, research interest or experience, community involvement, leadership qualities, the interview, the essay, and letters of recommendation. Admission committees typically consist of faculty, alumni and dental students.

Criminal Background Checks
Prerequisite for enrollment to dental school is consent for an external background check.  This check includes, but is not limited to, past criminal offenses and registry information.  If there is evidence of arrest for a crime(s), conviction for a crime(s), presence on an abuse registry, or other information which reasonably suggests that patient safety might be compromised, the student will be asked to provide additional information.

Citizenship/International Students
Dental schools vary as to whether they accept non-U.S. citizens. Some schools do accept non-citizens but require a substantial financial commitment up front.  Since not all schools accept non-citizens and since the financial commitment of those that do may be substantial, students should thoroughly research and carefully consider such a decision and discuss it with their pre-dental advisors early in their undergraduate years.

Websites
American Dental Education Association:   www.adea.org

American Dental Association:  www.ada.org

U of U College of Dentistry:  www.uuhsc.utah.edu/dental

Pre-Dentistry Coursework Checklist
____ Trigonometry (MATH 1060) or higher*        ____ Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)

____ Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1610) **            ____ Principles of Chemistry II (CHEM 1220)

____ Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)                  ____ Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 2310)

____ Principles of Biology Labs                                   ____ Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 2320)

____ Organic Chemistry Labs (CHEM 2315 & 2325)

One year of physics—choose one sequence: ***

____College Physics I (PHYS 2010) and College Physics II (PHYS 2020) or

____Physics for Scientists and Engineers (PHYS 2210 & 2220) – required for some science majors

 

*A calculus course is strongly recommended.

**A minimum of 8 semester hours of biology is required, but additional advanced work is highly recommended, especially a biology course dealing with cell structure and function.

***Most students enroll in the 2010/2020 sequence.  See your advisor for help in choosing the appropriate sequence for your major.

Recommended Courses: A physiology course, Biochemistry 3510 (some schools require it).  An anatomy course is highly recommended.

Note:  The above are prerequisites for most dental schools.  Some dentistry programs may have different requirements.  Check the websites for individual schools or contact your pre-dentistry advisor for more information.

NOTE: Please always consult the DSU Catalog for updated course information (http://catalog.dixie.edu/courses/)

 

Pre-Dental Hygiene Advisement Information

Dixie State University offers an Associate of Applied Science/Bachelor of Science Dual degree in Dental Hygiene. The program is accredited by the American Dental Association, Commission on Dental Accreditation.

The Dental Hygienist plays an important role in the field of health services. He/she is a specialist in the maintenance of good oral health, educating patients in the prevention of dental disease. Dental hygienists perform their services under the supervision of licensed dentists, and are the only members of the dental team who are licensed to perform a service directly on the patient.

Dental hygiene is a prevention oriented profession that offers a variety of career options. Currently, there are over 120,000 licensed dental hygienists in the United States. A dental hygienist can pursue numerous career options which are defined by the American Dental Hygienists’ Association as clinician; oral health promoter/educator; researcher; administrator/manager and consumer advocate. A Dental Hygienists must obtain a license to practice.

Contributing factors to dental hygiene salaries include experience, level of responsibilities, and type of setting. There is a considerable difference in salaries based on geographic region within the country, and proximity to a large metropolitan area. Information from US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2008-2009 indicates the median, hourly earning of dental hygienists were $30.19 in May 2006. The middle 50 percent earned between $24.63 and $35.67 an hour. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $19.45, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $41.60 an hour. (Wages vary around the country.)

The vision of the Dental Hygiene program is to provide a progressive atmosphere that meets the needs of culturally diverse population through excellence in clinical care, disease prevention and health promotion. Our comprehensive education atmosphere fosters effective, positive teamwork and emphasized open lines of communication. Our vision is to have a student selection process which is competitive, fair, and ethical, allowing for a diverse population to be selected, with each contributing positively to the dental team in order to further the advancement of dental health. The Dixie State University Dental Hygiene Program values teamwork, communication and mutual respect and promotion of life-long learning opportunities for our students, patients, faculty, and community dental health professionals.

Students are instructed in the theoretical knowledge and clinical skills essential for dental hygiene practices. This includes anesthesia procedures and limited expanded functions. Upon successful completion of the program, graduates must pass the national written exam, and regional and state clinical board examinations to apply to become a registered dental hygienist (RDH).

·         The AAS DHYG program is a 2 year program (fall, spring, summer, fall, and spring semesters).

·         Applications will be kept for 2 years only.

·         20-24 students are accepted every year.

·         Applicants should be aware that in addition to the regular student tuition and fees for Dixie State University there is a lab fee which covers clinical supplies and instruments needed to complete the courses, as well as various other additional fees. These fees are subject to change every year. For more information, contact the Department Secretary.

·         DSUDH program is accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation http://www.ada.org/117.aspx

The mission of the Dixie State University Dental Hygiene Program is to produce dental hygienists of the highest ethical and professional standards by providing an exceptional academic and experiential curriculum, serving the needs of students, the University and the community at large.

In support of our vision and mission, the strategic goals of the DSUDH Program are:

Prepare dental hygiene students in the provision of comprehensive dental hygiene care, while emphasizing ethics and social responsibility.
Advance health through current evidence, innovative education, and the highest-quality care.
Attract, educate and graduate students who are prepared intellectually, technically and ethically to meet the oral health challenges of diverse communities.
Create an educational environment that fosters the development of interprofessional practice, lifelong learning, outstanding citizens and leaders, and oral health care professionals.

Dental Hygiene AAS/BS Dual Degree Application

http://dixie.edu/health/dental/aas_application.php

Applications MUST be submitted by JANUARY 10th!!
Submit completed applications to Joni Hale, Program Advisor, Taylor Health Science building room #254.

AAS/BS Application Packet
Before you can apply for the Dental Hygiene Program, you must submit an application for Admission to Dixie State University of Utah.

Applications may be obtained here or through the Admissions Office. You must include previous college transcripts, high school transcripts or GED test scores, and any other documentation they require.

For more information contact the Dixie State University Admissions Office, (435) 652-7701.

To apply for the Dental Hygiene Program only a completed application packet will be accepted, which includes all of the following:

·         Be admitted as a student to Dixie State University (Apply for Admissions; see above).

·         Complete the Dental Hygiene AAS/BS Dual Degree Application Packet.

·         Official transcripts showing grades for ALL prerequisite classes. (See the Transfer Articulation for questions about transfer credits.)

·         Confirmation of at least 100 clinical hours documented on the dentist’s letterhead, with the dentist’s signature, and state EXACT hours.

·         $50 Non-Refundable Application Fee (Paid to the cashiers office).

·         Completed Background Check.  THIS NEEDS TO BE COMPLETED BY THE JANUARY 10TH APPLICATION DEADLINE.
(Please do not wait until the last minute as this can take up to two weeks to complete.)

*All admission policies shall be applied without regard to race, color, ethnic background, national origin, religion, creed, age, citizenship, disability, sexual orientation, marital status, veteran status, or gender.

As part of our selection process you may be asked back for Round 2 which includes a series of 3 tests:

General Dental Knowledge Test
Wonderlic Cognitive Ability Test
Manual Dexterity Test
If selected for Round 2, you MUST make yourself available to come to Dixie State University to take these tests sometime during the first two weeks in February. You will be contacted via e-mail as to the exact dates of testing.

Successfull candidates are admitted according to a point value scale with the following weighted selection criteria:

(Highest to lowest)

Prerequisite GPA
Wonderlic Cognitive Ability Test
General Dental Knowledge Test
Manual Dexterity Test
Candidates will be notified of standing by letters emailed to each applicant. If you are accepted as the top 20-24 students into the Dental Hygiene Program the following must be completed within a month of being accepted.

Immunizations (Two-step TB, MMR & booster, TDaP, Hepatitis B (3 shot series), Hepatitis A (2 shot series), and Varicella or Chicken Pox Vaccine.)
Healthcare Provider BLS/CPR with AED training.
First Aid Certification
5 Panel Drug Screen
$500 Non-Refundable Deposit to secure position in the incoming class.
Individuals should give careful consideration to the mental and physical demands of the program prior to applying. The pressure involved in undertaking the responsibilities of direct patient care should be considered upon applying to the program.

Individuals should understand that many procedures performed by a dental hygienist expose them to blood-borne pathogens requiring strict adherence to infection control protocols. In addition, it is an important educational experience to participate as a patient in pre-clinic and in the pain control lab.

Dental Hygiene Courses

 

AAS/BS Program Prerequisites  *MUST HAVE BEEN TAKEN WITHIN THE LAST 7 YEARS*

PREREQUISITES TO BE COMPLETED PRIOR TO APPLICATION DEADLINE
These courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better,
if taken more than once, then most recent grade will be accepted.
Course Number
Course Name
Credits
CHEM 1110*
Elementary General/Organic Chemistry
4
CHEM 1115*
Elementary General/Organic Chemistry Lab
1
BIOL 2420*
Human Physiology
3
BIOL 2425*
Human Physiology Lab
1
BIOL 2320*
Human Anatomy
3
BIOL 2325*
Human Anatomy Lab
2
NFS 1020
Scientific Foundations of Nutrition
3

GENERAL EDUCATION PREREQUISITES
These courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better
prior to beginning the Dental Hygiene Program.
If this is not accomplished, the student’s position will go to an alternate.
ENGL 1010
Introduction to Writing
3
ENGL 2010
Intermediate Writing
3
MATH 1030 -OR-
MATH 1040 -OR-
MATH 1050
Quantitative Reasoning -OR-
Intro to Statistics -OR-
College Algebra/Pre-Calculus
3-4
SOC 1010 -OR-
SOC 1020
Introduction to Sociology -OR-
Social Problems
3
PSY 1010
General Psychology
3
Sample Pre-Dental Hygiene Study Plan:

 

Fall Semester Year ____1_____
Spring Semester Year ____1_____
Course #
Course Description
Credit
Course #
Course Description
Credit
BIOL 3000
Rural Health Scholars
1
BIOL 3000
Rural Health Scholars
1
ENGL 1010
Introduction to Writing
3
ENGL 2010
Intermediate Writing
3
SOC 1010 -OR-
SOC 1020
Introduction to Sociology -OR-
Social Problems
3
PSY 1010
General Psychology
3
MATH 1030 -OR-
MATH 1040 -OR-
MATH 1050
Quantitative Reasoning -OR-
Intro to Statistics -OR-
College Algebra/Pre-Calculus
3-4
NFS 1020
Scientific Foundations of Nutrition
3
LIB 1000 -OR-

LIB 1010
Information Literacy
0-1
CIS 1200 -OR-

CIS 1201
Computer Literacy
0-3
MUSC 1010
Intro to Music
3
HLOC 1000
Medical Terminology
2

HLOC 1001
FYE: Allied Health
1

Total Credits:
13-15
Total Credits:
13-16
Fall Semester Year ____2_____
Spring Semester Year ____2_____
Course #
Course Description
Credit
Course #
Course Description
Credit
BIOL 3000
Rural Health Scholars
1
BIOL 3000
Rural Health Scholars
1
BIOL 2320*
Human Anatomy
3
BIOL 2420*
Human Physiology
3
BIOL 2325*
Human Anatomy Lab
2
BIOL 2425*
Human Physiology Lab
1
CHEM 1110*
Elementary General/Organic Chemistry
4
FCS 1500
Human Development Lifespan
3
CHEM 1115*
Elementary General/Organic Chemistry Lab
1
PHIL 1120 –OR-PHIL 1250
Social Ethics –OR-

Reasoning and Rational Decision-Making
3
COMM 2110
Interpersonal Communications
3
HIST 1700 –OR-

POLS 110
American Civilization –OR- American Government
3
DHYG 1005
Intro to Dental Sciences
1

Total Credits:
15
Total Credits:
14
Dental Hygiene Licensing Exams & Links

To register for the National Board Dental Hygiene Exam log onto:
http://www.ada.org/en/jcnde/examinations/national-board-dental-hygiene-examination

To register for the WREB clinical exam to practice dental hygiene in Utah and many of the Western United States log onto:

Western Regional Examining Board

To apply for licensure in the State of Utah log onto:
http://www.dopl.utah.gov/

A good board review course that we recommend is through Dental Hygiene Seminars. Follow the link to register.
http://www.dhseminars.com/

Pre-Veterinary Advisement Information

Veterinarians care for the health of animals and work to improve public health. They diagnose, treat, and research medical conditions and diseases of pets, livestock, and other animals. Veterinarians in private clinical practices treat the injuries and illnesses of pets and other animals with a variety of medical equipment, including surgical tools and x-ray and ultrasound machines. They provide treatment for animals that is similar to the services a physician provides to treat humans.

The following are examples of types of veterinarians:

Companion animal veterinarians treat pets and generally work in private clinics and hospitals. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, more than 75 percent of veterinarians who work in private clinical practice treat pets. They most often care for cats and dogs, but also treat other pets, such as birds, ferrets, and rabbits.

Equine veterinarians work with horses. In 2012, about 6 percent of private practice veterinarians diagnosed and treated horses.

Food animal veterinarians work with farm animals such as pigs, cattle, and sheep. In 2012, about 8 percent of private practice veterinarians treated food animals.

Food safety and inspection veterinarians inspect and test livestock and animal products for major animal diseases, provide vaccines to treat animals, enhance animal welfare, conduct research to improve animal health, and enforce government food safety regulations.

Research veterinarians work in laboratories, conducting clinical research on human and animal health problems. (From the online Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2015-2016)

THE APPLICATION PROCESS

Applications for veterinary schools are initiated through the centralized, online Veterinary Medical College Application Service (VMCAS) (www.aavmc.org). The VMCAS application system opens in May and all application materials, which include the VMCAS application, official transcripts, three letters of evaluation, and the VMCAS application fee, must be submitted in September. Test scores are not submitted to VMCAS, but are submitted to individual schools. The cost to use VMCAS is $195 for the first school designation and $100 for each additional school. Students who are seeking a comprehensive guide to school-specific requirements may want to consider purchasing access to the Veterinary Medical School Admissions Requirements (VMSAR) booklet, which can be purchased as a hard-copy book or an online supplement through the AAVMC website.

ACADEMIC GUIDELINES

Applicants to most veterinary schools are not required to have a Bachelor’s degree, but most successful applicants do have one. There is no preferred major in order to be admitted to veterinary programs. Admission to veterinary school is highly competitive as there are only 28 schools in the United States that are accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). Minimum acceptable GPAs and letter grades vary among schools, but it is expected that you receive a grade of at least a C or C- in all of your prerequisite coursework. Applicants with higher GPAs will be more successful, providing they also meet requirements for community service and veterinary and animal experience. It is imperative that you research your top school choices to determine their individual admissions requirements.

NON-ACADEMIC GUIDELINES

Aside from academic excellence, vet schools expect applicants to have a variety experiences in each of five areas: Research, Community Activities, Veterinary, Animal, and Employment. These areas are listed on the American Association of Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) website and incorporated on your VMCAS application. Below is a description of what types of experiences are expected in each area:

Research. Veterinary schools want applicants to be familiar with the scientific method and its application in the research process. Research experiences do not have to be animal-related or veterinarian-assisted, but veterinarian-assisted research experiences can be listed under this area.

Community Activities. This section of your VMCAS application can include extracurricular and/or community activities in which you have participated, including high school activities.

Veterinary. Veterinary experiences are those which are related to animals AND were supervised by a veterinarian. Research involving a veterinarian should NOT be included in this section, but listed in the Research section instead. It is also important to recognize that experiences listed here CAN NOT also be included in the Animal or Employment sections, and only COMPLETED hours can be included. Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine suggests that applicants have 400 or more hours of veterinary experience to be successful at their school, while admitted applicants at University of California—Davis had an average of 2,000 hours. The minimum requirement at University of California—Davis is 180 hours.

Animal. Animal experiences are those which involve animals but were NOT completed under the direction of a veterinarian. All experiences, whether paid, voluntary, or academic, can be included in this section. Experiences listed here CAN NOT also be listed under the Veterinary or Employment sections, and only COMPLETED hours can be included. Applicants should have a MINIMUM of 200 hours completed with both large and small animals (400 hours total) prior to applying to vet school.

Employment. The Employment section of your VMCAS application can include any experiences for which you received monetary reimbursement. Experiences listed here CAN NOT also be listed under the Veterinary, Animal, or Research sections of your application, and only COMPLETED hours can be included.

To help you decide where to list your experiences on your application, the AAVMC has provided the following diagram:

The VMCAS application also has an Awards and Honors section for students to list their academic and non-academic accomplishments. This includes those recognitions received in high school.

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION REQUIREMENT (GRE)

According to the AVMA website (www.avma.org), the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required by most vet schools, but some also require the Biology GRE. Test scores are valid for five years from the day they were taken. Some schools may accept the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) in place of the GRE. The AAVMC provides no recommendation about what scores are acceptable for admission, but schools typically expect applicants to be at or above the 75th percentile. Be sure to check school websites for specific information regarding required entrance examinations.

The GRE revised General Test is comprised of six sections for an overall test time of 3 hours and 45 minutes:

1.       Verbal reasoning (2 sections, 20 questions per section, 30 minutes per section)

2.       Quantitative reasoning (2 sections, 20 questions per section, 35 minutes per section)

3.       Analytical writing (1 section, two separate tasks, 30 minutes per task

4.       Unscored or research section (for ETS purposes only)

On test day you will be asked to designate which schools you would like to receive your scores. Test scores are not uploaded to the VMCAS application.

LETTERS OF EVALUATION

VMCAS requires that you submit at least three letters of recommendation, but makes no recommendation about who should write these letters. It is your job to determine the specific requirements for individual schools and make sure that the letters fulfill those requirements, although most schools require at least one letter from a veterinarian. The VMCAS application will only accept a maximum of six evaluation letters.

INTERVIEWS

Vet schools usually require personal, on-campus interviews.  Selected candidates will be contacted to arrange an interview.  Interviews vary by school.  Applicants should check with the schools to which they have applied for the interview timeline.   The interview is an important part of the selection process, and candidates should prepare well for the interview.   Practice interviews are available through the Rural Health Scholars program. Contact an advisor to set up a mock interview.

OTHER VET-RELATED CAREERS

Veterinary Technician. A veterinary technician is essentially the veterinarian’s nurse, completing tasks in radiology, anesthesiology, surgery, and educating clients. According to the National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America (NAVTA), graduation from a two-year AVMA accredited program at a higher education institution qualifies one for the job (navta.site-ym.com). Veterinary technicians must also pass a credentialing exam, usually state-specific, as well as the Veterinary Technician National Examination (VTNE). Average yearly salary for a veterinary technician was $31,760 in 2013 (Bureau of Labor Statistics). Some veterinary technicians choose to specialize in areas such as veterinary psychology, veterinary dentistry, or may choose to specialize according to a specific type of animal, such as marine, equine, or aviary.

Veterinary Technologist. According to the AVMA, a veterinary technologist differs from a veterinary technician in the level of education. A veterinary technologist has a bachelor’s degree in veterinary technology from an AVMA-accredited program. Annual salaries are similar to those of veterinary technicians, with the average being $31,760 in 2013 (Bureau of Labor Statistics). The BLS also explains that many veterinary technologists work in research-related jobs under the direction of a scientist, although some work in private clinical practice, while veterinary technicians primarily work in private clinical practice under a licensed veterinarian.

Veterinary Assistant. There is no degree required to become a veterinary assistant, other than a high school diploma or GED equivalent, but it is expected that some sort of certification is completed through a NAVTA/AVA approved school. One of these programs is Jordan Applied Technology Center in West Jordan, Utah. A full list of programs can be found at https://navta.site-ym.com/?page=vet_asst_program. Veterinary assistants support the veterinarian by scheduling appointments, sterilizing medical equipment, and assisting in non-invasive medical procedures. The average salary for a veterinary assistant is around $22,000 per year. A few government animal control positions pay almost $40,000 per year, but these jobs make up only 0.01% of all veterinary assistant positions.

Veterinary Physical Therapist. Individuals seeking to become a veterinary physical therapist may have to attend physical therapy school. Due to the relative newness of the field, there is little data about specific requirements. One website states that physical therapists, physical therapist assistants, veterinarians, and veterinary technicians may learn how to treat animals using physical therapy by enrolling in a weekend course or an animal rehabilitation certificate program.

 

WEBSITES:

American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA): https://www.avma.org/Pages/home.aspx

Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC): http://www.aavmc.org/

Veterinary Medical College Application Service (VMCAS): http://www.aavmc.org/

Registration for GRE Exam: http://www.ets.org/gre

Registration for MCAT Exam: https://www.aamc.org/students/applying/mcat/

 

 

 

 

 

Sample Pre-Veterinary Four-Year Academic Plans

Starting with General Biology and College Algebra

FALL                                                                       SPRING                                                                SUMMER

Year 1:                                                                                                                                                  Principles of

General Biology I (BIOL 1610)                      Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)     Chemistry II

College Algebra (MATH 1050)                     Trigonometry* (MATH 1060)                       (CHEM

General Biology II (BIOL 1620)                     1220) & Lab

 

Year 2:

Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 2310)              Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 2320)

General Psychology** (PSY 1010)              Genetics (BIOL 3060)

 

Year 3:

College Physics I (PHYS 2010)                       Statistics (MATH 1060)                                   Maymester-RHS

Biochemistry I *** (CHEM 4110)                                                                                                               Apply June 1st

Intro to Sociology (SOC 1010)                      Take GRE (or MCAT) in spring or summer

 

Year 4:

Courses to complete major                          Courses to complete major

 

* Calculus is not required for most veterinary schools, but is required for some science majors.  The major will determine which math class is taken.

** While psychology is not a prerequisite for most veterinary schools, topics from psychology will form 60% of the content of one exam of MCAT-2015, and topics from sociology will form 30%. To be well-prepared, students will need to complete an introductory course in psychology (General Psychology PSY 1010) and, possibly, sociology (Sociology SOC 1010).   Consult with your pre-vet advisor for more information. Most vet schools require the GRE only.

***One advanced biology course is a required prerequisite for some veterinary schools; additional advanced biology courses are recommended.  Biochemistry (CHEM 4110) can be used to satisfy this requirement.  It will also be important for students to know biochemistry since topics from biochemistry will be tested on MCAT-2015. Most vet schools require the GRE only.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pre-Physician Assistant Advisement Information

Physician assistants, also known as PAs, practice medicine on a team under the supervision of physicians and surgeons. They are formally educated to examine patients, diagnose injuries and illnesses, and provide treatment.

 

Physician assistants typically do the following:

·         Review patients’ medical histories

·         Conduct physical exams to check patients’ health

·         Order and interpret diagnostic tests, such as x rays or blood tests

·         Make diagnoses concerning a patient’s injury or illness

·         Give treatment, such as setting broken bones and immunizing patients

·         Educate and counsel patients and their families—for example, answering questions about how to care for a child with asthma

·         Prescribe medicine when needed

·         Record a patient’s progress

·         Research the latest treatments to ensure the quality of patient care

·         Conduct or participate in outreach programs; talking to groups about managing diseases and promoting wellness

 

Physician assistants work under the supervision of a physician or surgeon; however, their specific duties and the extent to which they must be supervised differ from state to state.

Physician assistants work in all areas of medicine, including primary care and family medicine, emergency medicine, and psychiatry. The work of physician assistants depends in large part on their specialty and what their supervising physician needs them to do. For example, a physician assistant working in surgery may close incisions and provide care before and after the operation. A physician assistant working in pediatrics may examine a child and give routine vaccinations.

In rural and medically underserved areas, physician assistants may be the primary care providers at clinics where a physician is present only 1 or 2 days per week. In these locations, physician assistants confer with the physician and other healthcare workers as needed and as required by law.

Some physician assistants make house calls or visit nursing homes to treat patients, reporting back to the physician afterward. (Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014. Retrieved from www.bls.gov)

 

A career as a physician assistant may appeal to some students because the educational training is shorter and does not include a residency requirement. PAs typically have a more flexible schedule than physicians, work fewer hours per week, and can switch between specialty areas without returning to school for additional training.

The University of Utah offers a Master of Physician Assistant Studies degree.  The program begins in late May and continues for 25 months.  Admitted students must hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally-accredited U.S. institution and be able to meet the program’s technical standards.   Applications are accepted from U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

Sample Pre-Physician Assistant Four-Year Academic Plans
Plan A: Starting with General Chemistry and College Algebra

FALL                                                                       SPRING                                                                SUMMER

Year 1:

General Chemistry I (CHEM 1010/15)       Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210/15)

College Algebra (MATH 1050)                      Trigonometry* (MATH 1060)                       CHEM 1220/25

 

Year 2:

Organic Chemistry I** (CHEM 2310)        Organic Chemistry II** (CHEM 2320)

Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1610)              Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)

Statistics (MATH 1040)

Year 3:

Biochemistry or advanced biology            Advanced biology                                           Apply to PA

Advanced biology or physiology                 Advanced biology course                              Programs

Advanced biology course                              Take GRE in spring or summer

 

Year 4:

Advanced biology course                              Advanced biology course
Plan B: Starting with Principles of Chemistry

FALL                                                                       SPRING                                                                SUMMER

Year 1:

Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)     Principles of Chemistry II (CHEM 1220)

Math *                                                    Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1610)

 

Year 2:

Organic Chemistry I ** (CHEM 2310)        Organic Chemistry II** (CHEM 2320)

Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)           (recommended course)

 

Year 3:

Biochemistry or advanced biology            Advanced biology                                            Apply to PA

Advanced biology or physiology                 Advanced biology course                             Programs

Advanced biology course                              Take GRE or MCAT in spring or summer

 

Year 4:

Advanced biology course                              Advanced biology course

 

*Calculus is not required for most programs, but is required for some science majors.  The major will determine which math class is taken.

**Different programs require varying levels of Organic Chemistry but most students complete only 1 semester of Org. Chem.

NOTE: Please always consult the DSU Catalog for updated course information (http://catalog.dixie.edu/courses/)

The Application Process
Students should begin researching schools early in their academic careers as programs have different admission requirements.  Students may find the information contained in the Physician Assistant Programs Directory helpful.  This online directory costs $35 for a one-year subscription; visit www.paeaonline.org (Click “Publications”, then “PA Program Directory”).  A free listing of PA programs can be viewed at www.paeaonline.org (Click “Member Programs”).

Students can apply to more than 100 PA programs, including the U of U’s PA Program, by completing their initial application through the web-based Central Application Service for Physician Assistants (CASPA).  Programs not requiring CASPA will accept applications directly to their schools.  Schools using CASPA may or may not require a supplemental application; check with each program.

Typically applicants must have achieved a cumulative and sciences GPA of at least 3.00 on all course work completed at the college or university level, or attain a science GPA of 3.0 on the most recently completed 40 semester hours of science coursework.  They must have a minimum of 1,000 hours of direct patient healthcare experience and have taken the GRE General Test within the last 10 years.   All applicants must be able to meet the program’s technical standards.

PA applications are accepted beginning in April and early submission is recommended.  Each applicant must complete the CASPA application which includes letters of recommendation and transcripts.  GRE or MCAT scores should be sent directly to the schools.  For most programs, the application deadline is November 1 and the majority of prerequisite courses should be completed by then, as Admission Committees give special attention to an applicant’s performance in the science courses.  Students should consult the PA Program Directory, or individual school websites, for application deadlines and other school-specific application information.

Diversity in the Physician Assistant Profession
Many physician assistant schools seek a diverse class of students.  Programs seek to recruit individuals of the highest possible quality from diverse ethnicities, socioeconomic backgrounds, and life experiences to the PA profession and to equip them with the necessary clinical and professional knowledge, skills and abilities to provide high quality, compassionate medical care to diverse patient populations.  Students may contact their pre-PA advisors and individual PA schools for more information.

Entrance Examination Requirement
The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test or Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) is required for admission most PA programs.  Arrange to take the test early to ensure receipt of the scores prior to the November 1 application deadline.  For more information about the test and to register, visit www.gre.org or www.aamc.org/students/mcat/start.htm

 

Letters of Evaluation/Recommendation
Most physician assistant schools require two to three reference letters from faculty, advisors, or supervisors of patient care experiences.  Students should develop these contacts early in their college careers and keep their references informed about academic progress and work experiences.  Letter writers submit their letters, whether paper or electronic, directly to CASPA.

Interviews
Interviews vary by school; students should check with the individual schools for their interview timelines.  Most programs require personal, on-campus interviews.  Candidates selected will be contacted to arrange an interview.  Interviews are scheduled from September through December.  Practice interviews are available through the Rural Health Scholars.

Criminal Background Checks
The CASPA application asks, “Have you been disciplined or placed on academic probation while attending an academic institution?” and “Have you ever been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor?”  Students answering “yes” will need to provide an explanation.  When applicants are accepted into a program, students agree to have a criminal background check completed.

Citizenship/International Students
Only citizens or permanent residents of the United States are eligible for admission to the University of Utah Physician Assistant Program.  A few PA programs admit non-citizens.  Since the odds can be challenging, non-citizen students should thoroughly research and carefully consider such a decision and discuss it with their Pre-PA advisors early in their undergraduate years.  For the U of U Physician Assistant program, the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required of all applicants for whom English is not their native language.   See your pre-PA advisor for more information.

Websites
American Academy of Physician Assistants: www.aapa.org

Physician Asst. Education Association: www.paeaonline.org

Central Application Service for Physician Assistants (CASPA): www.caspaonline.org

U of U Physician Assistant Program:  www.medicine.utah.edu/upap

 

Pre-Physician Assistant Coursework Checklist
_____ Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)        _____ Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 2310)

_____ Principles of Chemistry II (CHEM 1220)       _____ Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 2320) **

_____ Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1610)                                _____ Advanced Biology**

_____ Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)               _____ Advanced Biology**

_____ Biochemistry (CHEM 3510) or Cell and Molecular Biology I (BIOL 3550)

_____ Intro to Statistics (MATH 1040)

 

One from:

_____ Exercise Physiology (PEHR 2020)

_____ Vertebrate Physiology (BIOL 4500)

_____ Human Physiology (BIOL 2420)

 

* Organic Chemistry II is recommended

*Two advanced biology courses are required or strongly recommended for most programs; however, accepted applicants average 6 to 12 courses.  Highly recommended advanced biology courses include:

Cell & Molecular Biology (BIOL: 3550)                      Genetics (BIOL: 3030)

Human Anatomy (BIOL: 2320)                                    Histology (BIOL: 4190)

General Microbiology (BIOL: 2060)                            Biomedical Ethics (BIOL: 3100)

Immunology (BIOL: 3470)

 

Note:  The above are general prerequisites for PA Programs. Some PA Programs may have different requirements.  Check the websites for individual schools or contact your pre-PA advisor for more information.

NOTE: Please always consult the DSU Catalog for updated course information (http://catalog.dixie.edu/courses/)

 

 

Training Programs for PA’s To Get Experience
Certified Nursing Assistant

SWATC                                                 (435)586-2899

www.swatc.edu                                              510 W 800 S Cedar City, UT 84720

 

Dixie State University                     (435)879-4830

www.dixie.edu                                 225 S 700 E St. George, UT 84770

 

Mohave Community College       (928)505-3378

www.mohave.edu                          PO Box 980 Colorado City, AZ 86021

 

AAA CNA Training Centers            (801)759-5164

www.utahcnacenters.com           528 South Pinemont Drive Suit #C-250 Murray,UT 84123

 

An Act of Caring                                                (801)598-8370

www.anactofcaring.com              1918 W 4100 S #102 West Valley City, UT 84119

 

ccCNA                                                   (801)968-2262

www.cccna.com                               75 E 7200 S Suit A-2 Midvale, UT 84047

 

Mountainland ATC                           (801)-753-6282

www.mlatc.edu                                 2301 W. Ashton Blvd Lehi, UT 84043

 

Orchard CNA Training Centers    (801)-770-2803

www.orchardcna.com                   766 S 400 E Orem,UT 84058

 

Ridgeview CNA Program               (435)-634-0710

www.ridgeviewcna.com                 919 S. Main St. George, UT 84790

 

Phlebotomy

SWATC                                                 (435)-586-2899

www.swatc.edu                                               510 W 800 S Cedar City, UT 84720

 

Utah School of Phlebotomy         (801)-898-9306

www.utahphleb.com                     call for times & locations in St. George

 

Phlebotomy Training Specialists       888-531-8378

www.drawblood.net                      528 South Pinemont Drive Suit #C-250 Murray,UT 84123

 

Oquirrh Mountain

www.utahplebotomyschool.com     5284 S Commerce Dr. C-254 Muray, UT 84107

 

Dixie State University                     (435)-652-7695

www.dixie.edu                                 225 S 700 E St. George, UT 84770

 

Cole Holland                                       (801)-759-5164

www.coleholland.com                  450 S 900 E, Suite 200 Salt Lake City, UT 84102

Pre-Nursing Advisement Information

Registered nurses (RNs) provide and coordinate patient care, educate patients and the public about various health conditions, and provide advice and emotional support to patients and their family members.

Registered nurses typically do the following;  Record patients’ medical histories and symptoms, Administer patients’ medicines and treatments, Set up plans for patients’ care or contribute to existing plans, Observe patients and record observations, Consult with doctors and other healthcare professionals, Operate and monitor medical equipment, Help perform diagnostic tests and analyze results, Teach patients and their families how to manage illnesses or injuries, Explain what to do at home after treatment

 

Most registered nurses work as part of a team with physicians and other healthcare specialists. Some registered nurses oversee licensed practical nurses, nursing assistants, and home health aides.

Registered nurses’ duties and titles often depend on where they work and the patients they work with. They can focus in the following areas:

A specific health condition, such as a diabetes management nurse who helps patients with diabetes or an oncology nurse who helps cancer patients
A specific part of the body, such as a dermatology nurse working with patients who have skin problems
A specific group of people, such as a geriatric nurse who works with the elderly or a pediatric nurse who works with children and teens
A specific workplace, such as an emergency or trauma nurse who works in a hospital or stand-alone emergency department or a school nurse working in an elementary, middle, or high school
Some registered nurses combine one or more of these specific areas. For example, a pediatric oncology nurse works with children and teens who have cancer.

Many possibilities for working with specific patient groups exist. The following list includes just a few other examples:

·         Addiction nurses
·         Cardiovascular nurses
·         Critical care nurses
·         Genetics nurses
·         Neonatology nurses
·         Nephrology nurses
·         Rehabilitation nurses
·         Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs)
Some nurses have jobs in which they do not work directly with patients, but they must still have an active registered nurse license. For example, they may work as nurse educators, healthcare consultants, public policy advisors, researchers, hospital administrators, salespeople for pharmaceutical and medical supply companies, or as medical writers and editors.

Registered nurses may work to promote general health, by educating the public on warning signs and symptoms of disease. They may also run general health screenings or immunization clinics, blood drives, or other outreach programs. (Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2015. Retrieved from www.bls.gov)

 

RNs practice in all healthcare settings: hospitals, nursing homes, medical offices, ambulatory care centers, community health centers, schools, and retail clinics. They also provide health care in more surprising locations such as camps, homeless shelters, prisons, sporting events and tourist destinations.

Registered nurses usually take one of three education paths: a bachelor’s of science degree in nursing (BSN), an associate’s degree in nursing (ADN), or a diploma from an approved nursing program. Registered nurses also must be licensed. BSN programs typically take 4 years to complete; ADN and diploma programs usually take 2 to 3 years to complete. All programs also include supervised clinical experience.

Sample Pre-Nursing Two -Year Academic Plans
Plan A:  Starting with Elementary Chemistry and Statistics

FALL                                                                          SPRING

Year 1:

Elementary Chem & Lab  (CHEM 1110/15) General Biology I & Lab (BIOL 1610/15)

General Psychology (PSY 1010)                                     Elementary Organic Biochemistry & Lab (CHEM 1120/25)

Statistics (MATH 1040)                                      Human Anatomy & Lab (BIOL 2320/25)

 

Year 2:

Human Physiology & Lab (BIOL 2420/25)   Intro to Human Pathophysiology (BIOL 4400)

Intro Microbiology & Lab (BIOL 2060/65)   Human Development Through the Lifespan (FCS 1500)

Scientific Foundations of Nutrition (NFS 1020)

 

Study for TEAS                                                     Take TEAS Spring

 

FALL                                                                       SPRING                                                                     SUMMER

Year 1:

Intermediate Algebra (MATH 1010)           Elementary Chem&Lab (CHEM 1110/15)     CHEM 1120/25

General Psychology (PSY 1010)                   Human Anatomy & Lab (BIOL 2320/25)

General Biology I (BIOL 1610/15)                Statistics (MATH 1040)

Year 2:

Human Physiology & Lab (BIOL 2420/25)   Intro to Human Pathophysiology (BIOL 4400)

Intro Microbiology & Lab (BIOL 2060/65)   Human Development Through the Lifespan (FCS 1500)

Scientific Foundations of Nutrition (NFS 1020).

 

NOTE: Please always consult the DSU Catalog for updated course information (http://catalog.dixie.edu/courses/)

 

Academic Guidelines
An overall GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale is the minimum for consideration for admission to the Southern Utah University Nursing Program.  In addition, a GPA of 3.0 or above in all prerequisite course work (both required and elective coursework) is required for most nursing programs. Remember that this is a minimum, and that most nursing programs have a 3.4-3.6 average GPA.

Non-Academic Guidelines
A broad exposure to nursing in more than one clinical setting is strongly recommended.  A suggested minimum for candidates applying to nursing programs is at least 50 total hours in two or three different settings, both inpatient and outpatient.  Community service is also suggested at a minimum of 50 hours. Most successful applicants will have well over this minimum.

The Application Process
Students can apply to many nursing schools by using the Nursing Centralized Application System (www.nursingcas.org).   Not all Nursing Programs participate in NursingCAS; applicants should check the individual school’s website to determine whether the program is participating.  Application deadlines also vary by program; applicants should check with the schools or the NursingCAS website for deadlines. Early application is strongly recommended.

Diversity in Nursing
The American Association of Colleges of Nursing acknowledges the importance of recognizing and understanding cultural diversity.  Program faculty, staff, and students strive to promote trust, respect, and appreciation for individual differences in matters of practice, research, and education.  Efforts are made to provide a supportive environment, one appreciative of human differences, while cooperating with each other in the constructive expression of ideas and actions.

Entrance Examination Requirement (TEAS)
The Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) is required for admission to most Nursing programs. Some schools require the NET, and some require HESI. Check with individual schools to be sure that you are taking the correct entrance exam.  Arrange to take the test early to ensure receipt of the scores prior to the application deadline.  For more information about the test and to register, visit the TEAS website: www.atitesting.com

Letters of Evaluation/Recommendation
Three letters of recommendation are required to apply to most Nursing programs.  One letter must come from a science professor.  The other two letters may come from someone who knows the student well, such as a supervisor or advisor.  Letters need to be mailed directly to the school in a sealed envelope.

Interviews
Some Nursing programs require personal, on-campus interviews.  Some will send out acceptances without interviews. Please check with individual schools.

Criminal Background Checks
In order to be licensed as a registered nurse in the state of Utah, the application must be in conformity with the Utah Nurse Practice Act.  Applicants who have been convicted of a felony, treated for mental illness or substance abuse should discuss their eligibility status for licensure with the Utah State Board of Nursing. Acceptance and completion of the nursing program does not assure eligibility to take the RN licensure exam. The Utah State Board of Nursing makes the final decision as to whether a license will be issued to practice nursing in the State of Utah. If you have questions regarding this, please contact the State Board of Nursing, 160 East 300 South, Salt Lake City, Utah 84111; Phone Number (801) 530-6628 or Toll Free in Utah (866) 275-3675.

Citizenship/International Students
Non-U.S. citizens are eligible for admission to most graduate programs in nursing. Non-citizen students should thoroughly research each individual program’s guidelines and discuss it with their pre-nursing advisors early in their undergraduate years.

Websites
American Nurses Association: www.nursingworld.org

NursingCAS: www.nursingcas.org

SUU Nursing Programs:  suu.edu/cose/nursing/

Dixie State University Nursing Programs: dixie.edu/health/nursing/index.php

University of Utah Nursing Programs: nursing.utah.edu/programs/prenursingstudents.php

 

Pre-Nursing Coursework Checklist
Applications will be accepted March 1st – May 1st only

Note:  The below are prerequisites for DSU’s Nursing program.  Some programs may have different requirements; check the program websites for details.   Contact your Pre-Nursing advisor for more information.

 

Course
DSU Equivalent
Credits
Human Anatomy/Lab
BIOL 2320/2325
4/1
Human Physiology/Lab
BIOL 2420/2425
3/1
Intro to Writing
ENGL 1010
3
Intermediate Writing
ENGL 2010
3
Math  (College Algebra, Intro to Statistics, or Quantitative Reasoning)
MATH 1030, 1040, or 1050 or higher GE Math
3-4
Chemistry and Lab w/ Organic Component
CHEM 1110/1115 or 1210/1215
4/1
General Psychology or Human Development
PSY 1010 or 1100 or FCS 1500
3
Nurse Assistant Course  (May be taken thru DSU or private entity)  LPN licensure will also meet this requirement.
NURS 1005/1007 (at DSU)
4
Other DSU courses may be required prior to the prerequisites for the nursing program. Students are placed in Math and English courses according to ACT or Accuplacer scores.
Human Anatomy/Lab and Human Physiology/Lab must be completed, with acceptable grades, before application can be submitted.  Any of the other prerequisites may be taken during the semester applications are due, but must be completed successfully before the start of the ADN program.
NOTE: Please always consult the DSU Catalog for updated course information (http://catalog.dixie.edu/courses/)

Pre-Pharmacy Advisement Information

Pharmacists dispense prescription medications to patients and offer expertise in the safe use of prescriptions. They also may provide advice on how to lead a healthy lifestyle, conduct health and wellness screenings, provide immunizations, and oversee the medications given to patients.

 

Pharmacists typically do the following:

Fill prescriptions, verifying instructions from physicians on the proper amounts of medication to give to patients
Check whether the prescription will interact negatively with other drugs that a patient is taking or any medical conditions the patient has
Instruct patients on how and when to take a prescribed medicine and inform them about potential side effects they may experience from taking the medicine
Advise patients about general health topics, such as diet, exercise, and managing stress, and on other issues, such as what equipment or supplies would be best to treat a health problem
Give flu shots and, in most states, other vaccinations
Complete insurance forms and work with insurance companies to ensure that patients get the medicines they need
Oversee the work of pharmacy technicians and pharmacists in training (interns)
Keep records and do other administrative tasks
Teach other healthcare practitioners about proper medication therapies for patients
Some pharmacists who own their pharmacy or manage a chain pharmacy spend time on business activities, such as inventory management. Pharmacists must also take continuing education courses throughout their career to keep up with the latest advances in pharmacological science.

With most drugs, pharmacists use standard dosages from pharmaceutical companies. However, some pharmacists create customized medications by mixing ingredients themselves, a process known as compounding.

 

The following are examples of types of pharmacists:

Community pharmacists work in retail stores such as chain drug stores or independently owned pharmacies. They dispense medications to patients and answer any questions that patients may have about prescriptions, over-the-counter medications, or any health concerns that the patient may have. They may also provide some primary care services such as giving flu shots.

Clinical pharmacists work in hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare settings. They spend little time dispensing prescriptions. Instead, they are involved in direct patient care. Clinical pharmacists may go on rounds in a hospital with a physician or healthcare team. They recommend medications to give to patients and oversee the dosage and timing of the delivery of those medications. They may also conduct some medical tests and offer advice to patients. For example, pharmacists working in a diabetes clinic may counsel patients on how and when to take medications, suggest healthy food choices, and monitor patients’ blood sugar.

Consultant pharmacists advise healthcare facilities or insurance providers on patient medication use or improving pharmacy services. They also may give advice directly to patients, such as helping seniors manage their prescriptions.

Pharmaceutical industry pharmacists work in areas such as marketing, sales, or research and development. They may design or conduct clinical drug trials and help to develop new drugs. They also may help to establish safety regulations and ensure quality control for drugs.

Some pharmacists work as college professors. They may teach pharmacy students or conduct research. For more information, see the profile on postsecondary teachers.

(Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014. Retrieved from www.bls.gov)

Sample Pre-Pharmacy Four-Year Academic Plans
Plan A: Starting with General Chemistry and College Algebra

FALL                                                                       SPRING                                                                SUMMER

Year 1:

College Algebra (MATH 1050)                      Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)

General Chemistry I (CHEM 1010)              Trigonometry (MATH 1060)                          CHEM 1220

General Education Elective                           General Education Elective**

 

Year 2:

Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 2310)             Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 2320)

Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1610)              Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)

Microeconomics (ECON 2010)                     Statistics

General Education Elective                           General Education Elective

 

Year 3:

College Physics I (PHYS 2010)                       Human Physiology (BIOL 2420)                   Take PCAT

Human Anatomy (BIOL 2320)                      Microbiology (BIOL 2060)                              Spring or

General Education Elective                           College Physics II (PHYS 2020)                     Summer

 

Year 4:

Apply to Pharmacy programs                      Complete Degree Program

 

Plan B: Starting with Principles of Chemistry I

FALL                                                                       SPRING                                                                SUMMER

Year 1:

Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)     Principles of Chemistry II (CHEM 1220)   Take PCAT

Calculus (MATH 1210)                                     Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1610)              in July or

General Education Elective                           General Education Elective                           September

 

Year 2:

Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 2310)             Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 2320)

Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)            Statistics (MATH 1040)

 

Year 3:

College Physics I (PHYS 2010)                       College Physics II (PHYS 2020)

Human Anatomy (BIOL 2320)                      Human Physiology (BIOL 2420)

Microeconomics (ECON 2010)                     Microbiology (BIOL 2060)

 

Year 4:

Apply to Pharmacy programs                      Complete Degree Program

 

*The U of U College of Pharmacy requires one year of college school physics, College Physics 2010, 2020 with a laboratory, not all Pharmacy schools require physics & it is not tested on the PCAT.

NOTE: Please always consult the DSU Catalog for updated course information (http://catalog.dixie.edu/courses/)

The Application Process
Students should begin researching schools early in their academic careers as programs have different admission requirements. Students may find the information contained in the Pharmacy School Admissions Requirements (PSAR) helpful. The printed directory costs $35 or can be downloaded for free; visit www.aacp.org/resources/student/pharmacyforyou/admissions/Pages/PSAR.aspx. To locate Pharmacy school websites go to www.pharmcas.org/collegesschools/schoolpages.htm

Students can apply to over 100 pharmacy schools, including the U of U College of Pharmacy, by completing their initial application through the web-based Pharmacy College Application Service (PharmCAS, www.pharmcas.org). Programs not participating in PharmCAS accept applications directly to their schools. Schools using PharmCAS may or may not require a supplemental application; check with each program.

U of U Pharmacy applicants must have achieved a cumulative 3.0 GPA to apply. For Fall 2012, applications are accepted between June 3, 2011 and December 1, 2011. Each applicant must complete the PharmCAS application which includes letters of reference and transcripts. A supplemental application and fee is also required for most schools.

Diversity in the Pharmacy Profession
Many pharmacy schools, including the U of U College of Pharmacy, seek a diverse class of students. Programs seek to recruit individuals from diverse ethnicities, socioeconomic backgrounds, and life experiences to the Pharmacy profession and to equip them with the necessary clinical and professional knowledge, skills and abilities to provide high quality, compassionate medical care to diverse patient populations. Students may contact individual pharmacy schools for more information.

Entrance Examination Requirement (PCAT)
The Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT), www.pcatweb.info, is required for applicants to most Pharmacy schools. Scores must be sent to PharmCAS whose code number is 0104. The PCAT must be taken no later than September prior to the application deadline. Pre-registration for the exam is required; dates are listed on the PCAT web site. Students should register for the test online.

Letters of Reference
Two letters of reference are required. Letters are processed through the PharmCAS application service and may be submitted electronically. These letters can be from an employer, professor, supervisor of a community service project, etc. They may not come from a family member or friend. They should be received by the application deadline.

Interviews
Interviews vary by school; students should check with their individual schools for interview timelines. The U of U College of Pharmacy requires personal, on-campus interviews. Applicants selected for an interview will be contacted via email or phone. Interviews are typically held in February.  Practice interviews are available through the Rural Health Scholars program.

Criminal Background Checks
The PharmCAS application asks, “Were you ever the recipient of any action by any faculty member, college or university for academic or professional misconduct or unacceptable academic performance?” and “Have you ever been convicted of a felony?” Students answering “yes” will need to provide an explanation. The U of U College of Pharmacy performs criminal background checks on newly enrolled students.   Other schools may participate in a centralized criminal background check program as well.

Citizenship/International Students
Pharmacy schools differ as to whether they accept U.S. permanent residents and/or foreign citizens.  Applicants are encouraged to check PharmCAS (under “School Information”) for each school’s admission policy.   Most Colleges of Pharmacy will consider applications from U.S. citizens, U.S. permanent residents, Canadian, and other foreign citizens.

Websites
U of U College of Pharmacy: www.pharmacy.utah.edu

Pharmacy College Application Service (PharmCAS): www.pharmcas.org

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy: www.aacp.org

Pre-Pharmacy Coursework Checklist
_____ Calculus (MATH 1210)

_____ Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)        _____ Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 2310)

_____ Principles of Chemistry II (CHEM 1220)      _____ Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 2320)

_____ Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1610)                                _____ Microeconomics (ECON 2010)

_____ Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)               _____ Microbiology (BIOL 2060)

_____ Human Anatomy (BIOL 2320)                         _____ Human Physiology (BIOL 2420)

_____ College Physics I & II if needed** (PHYS 2010 & 2020)

_____ 12 credits General Education Electives needed to apply;

_____ 20 credits General Education Electives needed to graduate from Pharm.D. program

 

**One year of college physics 2010 & 2020 must be completed for the University of Utah, with a lab.

NOTE: Please always consult the DSU Catalog for updated course information (http://catalog.dixie.edu/courses/)

Please note: Required classes must be taken as standard classroom-based courses. Guided Independent Study (GIS) or online courses are allowed only for General Education Electives.

The above are general prerequisites for Pharmacy programs. Some programs may have different requirements. Check the websites of the individual schools or contact your pre-pharmacy advisor for more information.

Pre-Physical Therapy Advisement Information

Physical therapists, sometimes called PTs, help injured or ill people improve their movement and manage their pain. These therapists are often an important part of rehabilitation and treatment of patients with chronic conditions or injuries.

Physical therapists typically do the following:

·         Review patients’ medical history and any referrals or notes from doctors or surgeons

·         Diagnose patients’ dysfunctional movements by observing them stand or walk and by listening to their concerns, among other methods

·         Set up a plan of care for patients, outlining the patient’s goals and the expected outcome of the plan

·         Use exercises, stretching maneuvers, hands-on therapy, and equipment to ease patients’ pain, help them increase their mobility, prevent further pain or injury, and facilitate health and wellness.

·         Evaluate a patient’s progress, modifying a plan of care and trying new treatments as needed

·         Educate patients and their families about what to expect from and how best to cope with the recovery process

Physical therapists provide care to people of all ages who have functional problems resulting from back and neck injuries; sprains, strains, and fractures; arthritis; amputations; neurological disorders, such as stroke or cerebral palsy; injuries related to work and sports; and other conditions.

Physical therapists are trained to use a variety of different techniques—sometimes called modalities—to care for their patients. These techniques include applying heat and cold and using assistive devices such as crutches, wheelchairs, and walkers and equipment, such as adhesive electrodes which apply electric stimulation to treat injuries and pain.

The work of physical therapists varies by type of patient. For example, a patient experiencing loss of mobility due to stroke needs different care from that given to an athlete recovering from an injury. Some physical therapists specialize in one type of care, such as orthopedics or geriatrics. Many physical therapists also work at preventing loss of mobility by developing fitness and wellness programs to encourage healthier and more active lifestyles.

Physical therapists work as part of a healthcare team, overseeing the work of physical therapist assistants and aides and consulting with physicians and surgeons and other specialists.

(Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014. Retrieved from www.bls.gov)

 

Physical Therapy is typically a three-year graduate program.  Students attend physical therapy school after they have completed an undergraduate degree at a four–year college.  Graduates of most physical therapy programs will earn a Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree.  Physical therapists are required to be licensed in the state or states in which they practice.  Physical therapists may also be certified as clinical specialists through the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties (ABPTS).

 

Sample Pre-Physical Therapy Four-Year Academic Plans
Plan A:  Starting with General Biology and College Algebra

FALL                                                                       SPRING                                                                SUMMER

Year 1:

General Biology I (BIOL 1610)                         Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)

College Algebra (MATH 1050)                        Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)

Year 2:

Principles of Chemistry II (CHEM 1220)       Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)

Elementary Psychology*** (PSY 1010)        Abnormal Psychology (PSY 3400)

Statistics course**

 

Year 3:

College Physics I (PHYS 2010)                         College Physics II (PHYS 2020)                        Apply to DPT programs

Advanced biology course                                 Exercise Physiology (PEHR 2020)                   beginning August 1st

Human Physiology (BIOL 2420)                     Take GRE in spring or summer

Year 4:

Human Anatomy**** (BIOL 2320)                Courses to complete the major

Advanced biology course

 

Plan B:  Starting with Principles of Chemistry

FALL                                                                       SPRING                                                                SUMMER

Year 1:

Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)        Principles Of Chemistry II (CHEM 1220)

Calculus* (MATH 1210)                                    Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1610)

Elementary Psychology*** (PSY 1010)

 

Year 2:

Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)               Abnormal Psychology (PSY 3400)

Statistics course**                                             Psychology course***

 

Year 3:

College Physics I (PHYS 2010)                         College Physics II (PHYS 2020)                        Apply to DPT programs

Advanced biology course                                 Exercise Physiology (PEHR 2020)                   beginning August 1st

Human Physiology (BIOL 2420)                      Take GRE in spring or summer

 

Year 4:

Human Anatomy**** (BIOL 2320)                Courses to complete the major

Advanced biology course

 

*Calculus is not required for most DPT programs, but is required for many science majors.  The major will determine which math class is taken. Most DPT programs require Trigonometry or a higher math course.  Many DPT programs accept AP credit for math only; all other prerequisite coursework must be taken for graded credit.

** DPT Programs will accept various statistics courses, but typically do NOT accept Introduction to Statistics (MATH 1040).

***Most DPT Programs requires two psychology courses.  Some DPT programs require an abnormal psychology course— Abnormal Psychology.

****Human Anatomy is not required for some DPT Programs, but it may be required by some programs.

NOTE: Please always consult the DSU Catalog for updated course information (http://catalog.dixie.edu/courses/)

Academic Guidelines
An overall GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) is the minimum for consideration for admission to the University of Utah DPT Program.  In addition, a GPA of 3.0 or above in all prerequisite course work (including elective science courses) is recommended.  The mean overall GPA of the U of U entering class is typically in the 3.6 to 3.7 range.

Non-Academic Guidelines
A broad exposure to physical therapy in more than one clinical setting is strongly recommended.  A suggested minimum for candidates applying to DPT programs is at least 100 total hours in two or three different settings, both inpatient and outpatient.  Most successful applicants will have well over this minimum.

The Application Process
Students can apply to many physical therapy schools by using the Physical Therapist Centralized Application Service (PTCAS) (www.ptcas.org).   Not all Physical Therapy Programs participate in PTCAS; applicants should check the “Directory” link on the PTCAS website, or check the individual school’s website, to determine whether the program is participating.  Currently, about 70% of all U.S. DPT programs are participating in PTCAS, including the U of U DPT Program.  For the 2011-2012 admissions cycle, PTCAS opened on July 5, 2011, and will close on June 1, 2012.  The PTCAS regular admission application deadline for most schools is November 1st, and notification of acceptance is by early March.  Some preference is given to well-qualified residents of Utah.  Since application deadlines may vary, applicants should check with the schools, or the PTCAS website, for deadlines. Early application is strongly recommended.

Diversity in Physical Therapy
Graduate Programs in Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science acknowledge the importance of recognizing and understanding cultural diversity.  Program faculty, staff, and students strive to promote trust, respect, and appreciation for individual differences in matters of practice, research, and education.  Efforts are made to provide a supportive environment, one appreciative of human differences, while cooperating with each other in the constructive expression of ideas and actions.

Entrance Examination Requirement (GRE)
The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test is required for admission to DPT Programs.  The GRE General Test is the only test required, not the Subject Test.  Arrange to take the test early to ensure receipt of the scores prior to the application deadline.  For more information about the test and to register, visit the GRE website: www.gre.org.

Letters of Evaluation/Recommendation
Three letters of recommendation are required to apply to most DPT programs.  One letter must come from a physical therapist and another from a professor in the applicant’s major area of study.  The third letter may come from someone who knows the student well, such as a supervisor or advisor.  Letters, whether paper or electronic, are sent directly to PTCAS.

Interviews
Most Physical Therapy Admission Committees requires personal, on-campus interviews.  Candidates selected will be contacted to arrange an interview.  Interviews are typically scheduled in January and notification of acceptance is normally made by early March. Each interview is typically 30 minutes in length and conducted by two interviewers from either the DPT faculty or from clinical PT staff at area clinics and hospitals.  The interview includes certain questions asked of all applicants, but also allows for some conversation.

Criminal Background Checks
On the PTCAS application, applicants are required to disclose and explain any felony or misdemeanor convictions.  Applicants offered admission to DPT programs are required to provide signed consent for conducting an External Criminal Background Investigation in addition to providing a signed Release of Information Waiver.  This occurs at the time applicants confirm the Program’s offer of admission.  Enrollment in DPT programs is contingent on a successful background check.  Applicants should also be aware that some clinical education sites will require drug screening for students performing clinical rotations.

Citizenship/International Students
Non-U.S. citizens are eligible for admission to some graduate programs in Physical Therapy.  However, most programs only accept coursework from U.S. institutions, and admission to non-citizens is very rare.  A small percentage of U.S. physical therapy programs admit non-citizens.   Since the odds can be challenging, non-citizen students should thoroughly research and carefully consider such a decision and discuss it with their pre-physical therapy advisors early in their undergraduate years.

Websites
American Physical Therapy Association:  www.apta.org

PTCAS:  www.ptcas.org

U of U DPT Program:  www.health.utah.edu/pt/

 

 

Pre-Physical Therapy Coursework Checklist
____ Trigonometry (MATH 1060) or higher           ____ Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)

____ Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1610)                   ____ Principles of Chemistry II (CHEM 1220)

____ Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)                  ____ General Psychology (PSY 1010)

____ Advanced biology course(s)*                           ____ One additional upper division psychology course

____ Human Physiology (BIOL 2420)                      ____Human Anatomy (BIOL 2320)

One course in statistics:

____ Probability & Statistics (MATH 3700) or Statistics in Psychology ** (PSY 3010)

 

Two semesters of physics—choose one sequence***:

____ College Physics I (PHYS 2010) and College Physics II (PHYS 2020) or

____ Physics for Scientists & Engineers I & 2 (PHYS 2210 & 2220)

 

*At least 4 credits of advanced biology coursework is required for admission to most programs. Additional advanced biology courses beyond this minimum are recommended.  Good choices include Animal Behavior, Vertebrate Physiology, Comparative Vertebrate Zoology, Cell & Molecular Biology, Immunology, Evolution, & Genetics.

**Must include ANOVA software.

***Most students enroll in the 2010, 2020 sequence.  The calculus-based sequences 2210, 2220 are for select science majors. See your advisor for help in choosing the appropriate sequence for your major.

NOTE: Please always consult the DSU Catalog for updated course information (http://catalog.dixie.edu/courses/)

Note:  The above are prerequisites for most DPT programs.  Some DPT programs may have different requirements; check the program websites for details.   Contact your pre-PT advisor for more information.

Pre-Occupational Therapy (OT) Advisement Information

Occupational therapists treat injured, ill, or disabled patients through the therapeutic use of everyday activities. They help these patients develop, recover, and improve the skills needed for daily living and working.

Duties
Occupational therapists typically do the following:

·         Observe patients doing tasks, ask them questions, and review their medical history

·         Evaluate a patient’s condition and needs

·         Develop a treatment plan for patients, laying out the types of activities and specific goals to be accomplished

·         Help people with various disabilities with different tasks, such as leading an autistic child in play activities

·         Demonstrate exercises—for example, joint stretches for arthritis relief—that can help relieve pain for people with chronic conditions

·         Evaluate a patient’s home or workplace and, based on the patient’s health needs, identify potential improvements, such as labeling kitchen cabinets for an older person with poor memory

·         Educate a patient’s family and employer about how to accommodate and care for the patient

·         Recommend special equipment, such as wheelchairs and eating aids, and instruct patients on how to use that equipment

·         Assess and record patients’ activities and progress for patient evaluations, for billing, and for reporting to physicians and other healthcare providers

Patients with permanent disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, often need help performing daily tasks. Therapists show patients how to use appropriate adaptive equipment, such as leg braces, wheelchairs, and eating aids. These devices help patients perform a number of daily tasks, allowing them to function more independently.

Some occupational therapists work with children in educational settings. They evaluate disabled children’s abilities, modify classroom equipment to accommodate children with certain disabilities, and help children participate in school activities.

Some therapists provide early intervention therapy to infants and toddlers who have, or are at risk of having, developmental delays.

Therapists who work with the elderly help their patients lead more independent and active lives. They assess patients’ abilities and environment and make recommendations. For example, therapists may identify potential fall hazards in a patient’s home and recommend their removal.

In some cases, occupational therapists help patients create functional work environments. They evaluate the work space, plan work activities, and meet with the patient’s employer to collaborate on changes to the patient’s work environment or schedule.

Occupational therapists also may work in mental health settings where they help patients who suffer from developmental disabilities, mental illness, or emotional problems. They help these patients cope with, and engage in, daily life by teaching skills such as time management, budgeting, using public transportation, and doing household chores. In addition, therapists may work with individuals who have problems with drug abuse, alcoholism, depression, or other disorders. They may also work with people who have been through a traumatic event.

Some occupational therapists, such as those employed in hospitals, work as part of a healthcare team along with doctors, registered nurses, and other types of therapists. They may work with patients with chronic conditions, such as diabetes, or help rehabilitate a patient recovering from a hip replacement surgery. Occupational therapists also oversee the work of occupational therapy assistants and aides.

www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/occupational-therapists.htm#tab-2

THE APPLICATION PROCESS

OT Centralized Application Service (OTCAS) provides a full-service web-based application and admissions process for prospective occupational therapy program applicants. https://otcas.liaisoncas.com/applicant-ux/#/login

NON-ACADEMIC GUIDELINES
Transcripts

Official university transcripts submitted to OTCAS showing completed prerequisite coursework and courses in progress. Transcripts may take 3-4 weeks to deliver. Be sure to plan for this when submitting your application.

 

Letter of reference

Three letters of reference submitted to OTCAS using their electronic using forms. At least one (1) reference must be from an occupational therapist under whom observation hours were spent. The other references should come from an individual who knows the applicant professionally (employer, professor, etc.). The reference should not be a relative of the applicant. Arrange for OTCAS to receive all of your references by November 20. The OTCAS application may be submitted without receipt of the reference. It is the responsibility of the applicant to ensure that all references have been received by the application deadline.

 

Required tests

GRE – Graduate Record Examination
Must be taken so the scores are received by Division by the admissions deadline of the year of application. Send your scores to the designated institution code 1982. (This is new as of 28Aug2015.) GRE test scores are only valid for 5 years.
If a student has multiple tests, we will take the highest component score from each test.  For example, we will take the higher verbal from first test and the higher quantitative from the second test.
Primary consideration will be given to applicants with an analytical writing score of 3.5 or higher. Average analytical writing score of those offered admissions for 2015 was a 4.2. We see an average of 150 on each verbal and quantitative sections.
English Proficiency if English is not the first language

TOEFL-Students must achieve a score of at least 90-91 (Internet based).
IELTS-Students must achieve a score of at least 7.0.
Applicants who have received a US Degree and have not left the country for more than two years since receiving the degree may use the degree as proof of English proficiency.
Contact Hours with an Occupational Therapy Professional

As a part of the application process students will be required to have a minimum of 50 hours contact with an occupational therapist (OTR). It is required that the student observes, works, or volunteers in at least two different settings. The second observation may be as few as 8 hours and counts toward the 50 hour minimum. You will be required to enter this information as part of your application, so keep a log of the facility name, OT name and contact info, dates, and number of hours. Some facilities may require a formal letter prior to allowing you to observe.

 

Academic Update

Academic Update in OTCAS must be submitted after the completion of fall semester to enter in fall semester’s grades and list planned courses for spring (if any). The academic update is opens in mid December. The academic update must be submitted by January 10. Applicants will be required to submit a transcript showing completion of fall courses to OTCAS.

 

Course Prerequisites
Prerequisite course work or approved equivalent coursework MUST be taken for a grade. CLEP and AP credit may not be used to fulfill a prerequisite course. Any coursework with a grade of C- or below will not be considered toward fulfillment of the occupational therapy prerequisites. If a course is repeated, only the highest grade achieved in the course will be use in calculating the prerequisite GPA. Applicants must have a prerequisite cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 point scale with at least a 3.0 in the science prerequisite courses (anatomy, physiology & physics/kinesiology) and a 3.0 in the non-science prerequisites (all other courses). In addition to a 3.0 prerequisite GPA, applicants must have a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA of all of their university coursework.

 

All prerequisite courses listed below must be completed by the end of the spring term (April or May) prior to the fall semester for which they are applying unless noted. OT prerequisite courses may not be taken the summer immediately preceding the start of the OT program.

Kinesiology or Biomechanics or Physics*- one course in kinesiology, biomechanics or general/college physics. The lab, if available, is highly recommended but not required. Must be complete and graded by Dec. 31 of the year the application is submitted. Note: applicants will update grades in OTCAS via the academic update.
Human Anatomy with lab* – one course taken within the past 5 years.
Human Physiology* – one course.
Applicants must have a grade for either Human Anatomy or Human Physiology complete and graded by Dec. 31 of the application year. The other course may be completed in the winter/spring term. Note: applicants will update grades in OTCAS via the academic update.
Human Development through Lifespan or Developmental Psychology through the Lifespan* – one course or the equivalent. Must cover entire lifespan, birth to death. Must be complete and graded by Dec. 31 of the year the application is submitted. Note: applicants will update grades in OTCAS via the academic update.
Anthropology – one course in cultural anthropology.
Abnormal Psychology – one course.
Sociology or Health Ed or Special Ed or Gerontology – one course from one of these areas. First Aid/CPR and personal health courses will not fill this requirement.
Statistics – one course.
Medical Terminology – one course.
Studio Arts Course – one course in an area of arts or crafts (painting, pottery, knitting, woodworking, etc). Art history, music, theater, dance, photography or survey classes will not count as fulfilling this prerequisite. A grade is not required for this course. This must be a formal course (lifelong learning, college, school district, community education, art store, etc.). The class must be at least 16 hours in length. If taken in the community, students must provide a certificate of completion or a letter from the instructor. This should be uploaded into OTCAS in the Program Materials section under Documents, then Catalog Course Descriptions.
Applicants must be able to demonstrate English language proficiency, strong word processing ability, and functional internet use.

Fieldwork Prerequisites
Failure to pass requirements imposed by fieldwork sites and the National Board for Certification of Occupational Therapists (NBCOT) may negatively effect student eligibility for fieldwork placements and to sit for the national certification exam. Requirements include but are not limited to the following: criminal background checks, drug screening, and health/immunization requirements.

 

Pre-Optometry Advisement Information

Optometrists examine, diagnose, treat, and manage disorders of the visual system, eye diseases, and injuries. They prescribe eyeglasses or contact lenses as needed.

Optometrists typically do the following:

·         Perform vision tests and analyze results

·         Diagnose sight problems, such as nearsightedness or farsightedness and eye diseases, such as glaucoma

·         Prescribe eyeglasses, contact lenses, and medications

·         Provide treatments such as vision therapy or low-vision rehabilitation

·         Provide pre- and postoperative care to patients undergoing eye surgery—for example, examining a patient’s eyes the day after surgery

·         Evaluate patients for the presence of diseases such as diabetes and refer patients to other healthcare providers as needed

·         Promote eye health by counseling patients, including explaining how to clean and wear contact lenses

 

Some optometrists spend much of their time providing specialized care, particularly if they are working in a group practice with other optometrists or physicians. For example, some optometrists mostly treat patients with only partial sight, a condition known as low vision. Others may focus on treating infants and children.

Many optometrists own their practice and may spend more time on general business activities such as hiring employees, ordering supplies, and marketing their business.

Optometrists also may work as postsecondary teachers, do research in optometry colleges or work as consultants in the eye care industry. (Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014. Retrieved from www.bls.gov)

 

Optometrists should not be confused with ophthalmologists or dispensing opticians. Ophthalmologists are physicians who perform eye surgery and treat eye disease in addition to examining eyes and prescribing eyeglasses and contact lenses. For more information on ophthalmologists, see the physicians and surgeons profile. Dispensing opticians fit and adjust eyeglasses and, in some states, fill contact lens prescriptions that an optometrist or ophthalmologist has written.

 

A degree in Optometry is a four-year professional degree.  More than 80% of pre-optometry students begin optometry school after completing a baccalaureate degree.  A few optometry programs permit entry to highly qualified students after 90 semester hours of undergraduate coursework.

Sample Pre-Optometry Four-Year Academic Plans
Plan A:  Starting with General Biology and College Algebra

FALL                                                                       SPRING                                                                SUMMER

Year 1:

General Biology I (BIOL 1610)                     Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)     CHEM 1220

Math (MATH 1050)                                         Trigonometry* (MATH 1060)                                                                                                                                                       Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)

Year 2:

Organic Chemistry (CHEM 2310)                                Organic Chemistry II** (CHEM 2320)

Calculus (MATH 1210)                                     Elementary Psychology (PSY 1010)

 

Year 3:

College Physics I (PHYS 2010)                       College Physics II (PHYS 2020)                    Apply late

Human Physiology** (BIOL 2420)              Microbiology (BIOL 2060)                            summer/ early fall

Take OAT in spring or summer

 

Year 4:

Anatomy course**                                          Biochemistry course**

Courses to complete major                          Courses to complete major

 

Plan B:  Starting with Principles of Chemistry

FALL                                                                       SPRING                                                                SUMMER

Year 1:

Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)     Principles of Chemistry II (CHEM 1220)

Calculus I* (MATH 1210)                                Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1610)

Elementary Psychology (PSY 1010)

 

Year 2:

Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)            Organic Chemistry II** (CHEM 2320)

Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 2310)

Statistics (MATH 1040)

 

Year 3:

College Physics I (PHYS 2010)                       College Physics II (PHYS 2020)                    Apply in

Human Physiology (BIOL 2420)**              Microbiology (BIOL 2060)                            late summer/early fall                                                                                    Take OAT in spring or summer

Year 4:

Anatomy course**                                          Biochemistry course**

Courses to complete major                          Courses to complete major

 

*Minimum requirements for admission to all optometry schools are one year each of biology, chemistry, physics, and English; and a college math course (most schools require at least one semester of calculus).  Program requirements vary; check the website www.opted.org for additional information about prerequisites (follow the links “About Optometric Education” and then “Student and Advisor Information”).

** These are recommended courses (and required at a few programs; see website above for details).

NOTE: Please always consult the DSU Catalog for updated course information (http://catalog.dixie.edu/courses/)

Academic Guidelines
For the 20 optometry schools nationwide, the cumulative average GPAs for the entering classes ranged from a 2.88 to a 3.66.  Some schools require at least a “C” in each of the prerequisite courses (see prerequisite list at the end of this Guide).  Students whose academic records fall significantly below the averages are unlikely to be accepted to optometry school.  A bachelor’s degree is not required at most optometry schools, but is typically preferred, and most students will have a bachelor’s degree prior to entry.   A summary of the student profile at U.S. optometry schools (and application deadlines) may be found at the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO) website: www.opted.org.  Follow the links “About Optometric Education” and then “Student and Advisor Information.”

Non-Academic Guidelines
Important non-academic factors include good moral character, excellent interpersonal skills, a deep commitment to optometric health care, evidence of leadership potential, and service to others.  Most optometry schools want evidence of a candidate’s exposure to the field of optometry.  Successful applicants will likely have worked, or volunteered, in an optometrist’s office.  Since some schools require a letter of evaluation/recommendation from an optometrist, it is important that students investigate opportunities for working/volunteering in such a setting early in their undergraduate years.

The Application Process
The centralized application service, OptomCAS, enables students to apply to multiple schools with a single application.  Candidates should check with their pre-optometry advisors for the most recent information.  The application is available beginning July 15th each year and should be submitted in the year preceding the year for which a student is seeking admission.  Since many optometry schools have rolling admission, it is in a student’s best interest to apply early (in late summer or early September).   Application deadlines vary; check the student profile section of www.opted.org, as noted above, for a roster of the deadlines at the individual schools.

Early Entry/Early Admission
Some optometry programs accept students for entry after 90 semester hours of undergraduate coursework.  Students entering at 90 semester hours are typically very strong academically and extremely well prepared.   Most programs prefer a bachelor’s degree, and a few require it.  Students may check the ASCO website, noted above, for the preferences at the schools in which they are interested.   Additionally, a few schools have an early admission (or early decision) cycle for well-qualified applicants.  This cycle typically begins in the fall or early spring of the year before matriculation. Grade point averages are usually higher (3.5 to 3.6) for successful students in early admission.

Diversity in Optometry
ASCO and its member institutions have embraced the concepts of diversity and multiculturalism in optometric education and in the profession. ASCO bases its diversity program on several assumptions including: (1) Greater diversity among health professionals is associated with improved access to care for our diverse society, greater patient choice and satisfaction, better patient-provider communication, and better educational experiences for all students, which will prepare them for the diverse communities they will serve in practice; (2) Diversity is good for optometric education and the profession; and (3) It is the right thing to do  (from ASCO website).

Entrance Examination Requirement (OAT)
The Optometry Admission Test (OAT) is required for admission to all colleges of optometry in the United States.  The OAT is a standardized, computer-based exam that consists of four tests:  Survey of the Natural Sciences (Biology, General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry); Reading Comprehension; Physics; and Quantitative Reasoning.  The scoring range is from 200 to 400.  OAT average scores increased at the schools in 2007, with averages ranging from 283 to 368 (averages may be found at www.opted.org under the “Student Profile” section). Students typically take the OAT after courses in mathematics, biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry and physics.  In addition, students prepare by self-study using online or OAT study guide materials (available at major bookstores) or by participating in a formal OAT test preparation course.  A candidate may retake the OAT but only after a 90-day waiting period.

Letters of Evaluation/Recommendation
Applicants typically obtain letters from science faculty members, faculty members from their major department, their pre-optometry advisor, etc.   At least one letter from a practicing optometrist is required as part of the application at some schools.  The mix of required letters varies by school; students should check the specific requirements for each optometry school to which they wish to apply.

Interviews
Optometry schools usually require personal, on-campus interviews.  Selected candidates will be contacted to arrange an interview.  The interview is an important part of the selection process, and candidates should prepare well for the interview.   Practice interviews are available through Rural Health Scholars.

Criminal Background Checks
The issue of criminal background checks (CBCs) for students applying to optometry school is rapidly changing.  Students should check with the individual optometry schools for information about whether a CBC is required.   Certain hospitals and optometric placements will require a CBC, regardless of whether an individual school requires one.  Students should make careful decisions, since charges or convictions may have later negative consequences.

Citizenship/International Students
Some optometry schools accept non-U.S. citizens. Fluency in the English language is important, and some schools require a financial affidavit confirming sufficient financial resources. Non-citizen students should carefully consider such a decision and explore the options with the individual optometry schools, and their pre-optometry advisors, early in their undergraduate years.

Websites
Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO):  www.opted.org

American Optometric Association:  www.aoa.org

 

Pre-Optometry Coursework Checklist
Minimum Requirements at Most Optometry Schools

____Calculus (MATH 1210)                                          ____ Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)

____Statistics (MATH 1040)                                         ____ Principles of Chemistry II (CHEM 1220)

____ Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1610)                   ____ Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 2310)

____ Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)                  ____ Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 2320)

____ Microbiology (BIOL 2060)

 

Two semesters of physics—choose one sequence*:

____ College Physics I (PHYS 2010) and College Physics II (PHYS 2020) or

____ Physics for Scientists & Engineers I & 2 (PHYS 2210 & 2220)

 

____ English course                                                        _____English course

____ Psychology course

 

*Most students enroll in the 2010, 2020 sequence.   The calculus-based sequences 2210, 2220 (certain majors only). See your advisor for help in choosing the appropriate sequence for your major.

Additional Recommendations (some of these are required at certain schools)

____Anatomy (BIOL 2320)                                                  _____Additional Psychology

____Biochemistry (CHEM 3510)

____Physiology (BIOL 2420)

 

NOTE: Please always consult the DSU Catalog for updated course information (http://catalog.dixie.edu/courses/)

Pre-Podiatry Advisement Information

Podiatrists provide medical and surgical care for people with foot, ankle, and lower leg problems. They diagnose illnesses, treat injuries, and perform surgery involving the lower extremities.

Podiatrists typically do the following:

·         Assess the condition of a patient’s feet, ankles, or lower legs by reviewing his or her medical history, listening to the patient’s concerns, and performing a physical examination

·         Diagnose foot, ankle, and lower-leg problems through physical exams, x rays, medical laboratory tests, and other methods

·         Provide treatment for foot, ankle, and lower leg ailments, such as prescribing special shoe inserts (orthotics) to improve a patient’s mobility

·         Perform foot and ankle surgeries, such as removing bone spurs and correcting foot and ankle deformities

·         Give advice and instruction on foot and ankle care and on general wellness techniques

·         Prescribe medications

·         Refer patients to other physicians or specialists if they detect larger health problems, such as diabetes

·         Read journals and attend conferences to keep up with advances in podiatric medicine

 

Podiatrists treat a variety of foot and ankle ailments, including calluses, ingrown toenails, heel spurs, and arch problems. They also treat foot and leg problems associated with diabetes and other diseases. Some podiatrists spend most of their time performing advanced surgeries, such as foot and ankle reconstruction. Others may choose a specialty such as sports medicine or pediatrics.

Podiatrists who own their practice may spend time on business-related activities, such as hiring employees and managing inventory. (Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014. Retrieved from www.bls.gov)

 

A degree in Podiatry is a four-year professional degree.   To enter a college of podiatric medicine, students must complete at least three years or 90 semester hours of college credit at an accredited institution. Over 95% of the students who enter a college of podiatric medicine have earned an undergraduate degree.

The University of Utah does not have a College of Podiatric Medicine. However, there are eight programs in the United States. You will find a link to the complete list of schools on the last page of this document.

Sample Pre-Podiatry Four-Year Academic Plans
Plan A:  Starting with General Biology and College Algebra

FALL                                                                       SPRING                                                                SUMMER

Year 1:

Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1610)              General Chemistry I (CHEM 1010)

Math (based on placement)                        Math (based on placement)

 

Year 2:

Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)     Principles of Chemistry II (CHEM 1220)

Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)

 

Year 3:

Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 2310)              Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 2320)            Apply beginning

College Physics I (PHYS 2010)                       College Physics II (PHYS 2020)                    September 1st

Advanced Biology**                                       Advanced Biology**

Take MCAT in spring or summer

Year 4:

Courses to complete major                          Courses to complete major

 

Plan B:  Starting with Principles of Chemistry

FALL                                                                       SPRING                                                                SUMMER

Year 1:

Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)     Principles of Chemistry II (CHEM 1220)

Calculus (MATH 1210)                                     Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1610)

 

Year 2:

Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1620)              Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 2320)

Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 2310)

 

Year 3:

College Physics I (PHYS 2010)                       College Physics II (PHYS 2020)                     Apply beginning

Advanced Biology**                                       Advanced Biology**                                       September 1st

Take MCAT in spring or summer

Year 4:

Courses to complete major                          Courses to complete major

 

*Calculus is not required for admission, but is required for some science majors.  The major will determine which math class is taken.

**One advanced biology course (with lab) is required at some schools; additional advanced biology courses are recommended.

NOTE: Please always consult the DSU Catalog for updated course information (http://catalog.dixie.edu/courses/)

American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine Averages
613 students were matriculated nationally in 2010

 

Average cumulative GPA:             3.3          Average MCAT Physical Science:                6.9

Average science GPA:                     3.1          Average MCAT Verbal Reasoning:             7.1

Average MCAT Biological Science:             7.4

Academic Guidelines
Individual schools post profiles of their students on their websites. Last year 579 students were admitted nationally. The average cumulative GPA was 3.3. The average science GPA was 3.1. Some schools require at least a “C” in each of the prerequisite courses (see prerequisite list at the end of this guide).

Non-Academic Guidelines
Important non-academic factors include good moral character, excellent interpersonal skills, a deep commitment to health care, evidence of leadership potential, and service to others.  Successful applicants will likely have volunteered or worked in a health care setting with patient contact, participated in organizations that serve others, participated in leadership opportunities, job shadowed podiatrists, and learned how to work independently and conduct research.

The Application Process
All applications for podiatric medical schools are initiated through the centralized, online American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine (AACPM) Application Service (www.e-aacpmas.org).   Ideally, applications should be submitted the September prior to the year for which a student is seeking admission. Most schools are willing to accept applications up until July. Since many schools have rolling admission, it is in a student’s best interest to apply early.  No supplemental applications are required by the podiatric medical schools.

Diversity in Podiatric Medicine
Many podiatric medical schools seek to recruit a diverse class of students, including students from groups underrepresented in podiatric medicine. According to the AACPM, in 2008-2009 Asian matriculants totaled 16.4%, African Americans 6.4%, Hispanic/Latinos 5% and American Indian/Alaskan Natives .4% of the entering class.

Entrance Examination Requirement (MCAT)
The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) is a standardized, computer-based exam and is required for admission to allopathic (M.D.), osteopathic (D.O.) & Podiatric (DPM) programs.  A new version of the MCAT in 2015 will differ from the current exam in several ways.  Students entering college in August 2012 will most likely be taking this new exam.  To determine the MCAT you will be taking (the current exam or the 2015 exam) and the appropriate preparation, please consult with your pre-medical advisor.  Preparation consists of completing the applicable pre-medical courses and then self-study and taking MCAT practice tests or participating in a formal MCAT test preparation course.

Letters of Evaluation/Recommendation
Applicants typically obtain letters from science faculty members, faculty members from the applicant’s major department, pre-podiatry advisors, research supervisors, volunteer coordinators, and podiatrists.   UI does not have a committee process for letters of evaluation; instead, students request letters from their individual evaluators.

Interviews
Podiatric medical schools usually require personal, on-campus interviews.  Selected candidates will be contacted to arrange an interview.  Interviews vary by school; applicants should check with the schools to which they have applied for the interview timeline.   The interview is an important part of the selection process, and candidates should prepare well for the interview.   Practice interviews are available through Rural Health Scholars.

Criminal Background Checks
Some podiatric medical colleges ask applicants whether they have a record of felonies or misdemeanors.   Students should make careful decisions throughout their undergraduate years, since charges for drug and/or alcohol use or possession, as well as other charges, can have negative consequences for an application.

Citizenship/International Students
Some colleges of podiatric medicine admit non-citizen international students.   However, some require full tuition and fees payment in advance.   Non-citizen students should thoroughly research and carefully consider such a decision and discuss it with their pre-podiatry advisors early in their undergraduate years.

Websites
American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine (AACPM): www.aacpm.org/

Links to all schools in the U.S.:  www.aacpm.org/html/collegelinks/cl_schools.asp

American Podiatric Medical Association: www.apma.org

DPM Mentors:  www.aacpm.org/contactpod

 

Pre-Podiatry Coursework Checklist
____ Trigonometry (MATH 1060) or higher           ____ Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210)

____ Principles of Biology I (BIOL 1610)                   ____ Principles of Chemistry II (CHEM 1220)

____ Principles of Biology II (BIOL 1620)                 ____ Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 2310)

____ Advanced Biology*                                              ____ Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 2320)

 

Two semesters of physics—choose one sequence*:

____ College Physics I (PHYS 2010) and College Physics II (PHYS 2020) or

____ Physics for Scientists & Engineers I & 2 (PHYS 2210 & 2220)

 

____English (to include Composition/Literature)

____English (to include Composition/Literature) ***

 

*At least one advanced biology course (with lab) is required at some schools.  Additional advanced biology courses are recommended.

**Most students enroll in the 2010, 2020 sequence.   The calculus-based sequences 2210, 2220 (select majors only). See your advisor for help in choosing the appropriate sequence for your major.

***All schools require 6-8 semester hours of English; students should check the individual school’s website to determine the specific requirement at each school and consult with their pre-podiatry advisor if there are questions.

NOTE: Please always consult the DSU Catalog for updated course information (http://catalog.dixie.edu/courses/)